weld

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Weld and Wëld

English[edit]

Reseda luteola

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English welde, wolde, from Old English *wielde, *weald, from Proto-Germanic *walþijō, *walþō (compare Dutch wouw, Middle Low German walde, wolde, French gaude), from Proto-Germanic *walþuz (forest). More at wold.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

weld

  1. A herb (Reseda luteola) related to mignonette, growing in Europe, and to some extent in America, used to make a yellow dye.
  2. The yellow coloring matter or dye extracted from this plant.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A person welding

Alteration of well (boil, rise), probably influenced by the past participle, welled.

Verb[edit]

weld (third-person singular simple present welds, present participle welding, simple past and past participle welded)

  1. (transitive) To join two materials (especially two metals) together by applying heat, pressure and filler, either separately or in any combination.
  2. (transitive) To bind together inseparably; to unite closely or intimately.
    • 1847: Alfred Lord Tennyson, The Princess
      Now should men see / Two women faster welded in one love / Than pairs of wedlock.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

weld (plural welds)

  1. The joint made by welding.
    • 2001, James E. Duffy, I-Car Professional Automotive Collision Repair (page 173)
      Excessive spot weld time may cause the electrode tips to mushroom, resulting in no focus of current and a weak weld.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Verb[edit]

weld (third-person singular simple present welds, present participle welding, simple past and past participle welded)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To wield.
    • 1485: Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte D'Arthur, p. 168 line 2 (Sommer edition)
      [Arthur says to a wicked giant] "he that alle the world weldeth gyue the ſorte lyf & ſameful dethe" ("He who wields all the world gives thee short life and shameful death")
    • 1485: Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte D'Arthur, p. 172 line 2 (Sommer edition)
      [Arthur says to conquering knights] "ye be worthy to welde all your honour and worship"
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], The Shepheardes Calender: [], London: [] Hugh Singleton, [], OCLC 606515406; reprinted as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, The Shepheardes Calender [], London: John C. Nimmo, [], 1890, OCLC 890162479:
      Turne thee to those that weld the awfull crowne

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • well (chiefly Moselle Franconian)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German wilde, from Old High German wildi, from Proto-West Germanic *wilþī, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

weld (masculine welde or welle, feminine weld or well, comparative welder or weller, superlative et weldste)

  1. (chiefly Ripuarian) wild

Usage notes[edit]

  • The traditional inflected forms are those with -ll- in all dialects. Those with -ld- are now predominant, however, in many dialects under standard German influence.

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

weld

  1. Soft mutation of gweld (to see).

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gweld weld ngweld unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.