sike

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See also: siké

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sike, the northern form of Old English sīċ (see sitch) and also from Old Norse sík; both from Proto-Germanic *sīką (slow flowing water; trickle). Cognate with Norwegian sik. Compare Scots sheuch.

Noun[edit]

sike (plural sikes)

  1. (Scotland, Northumbria) A gutter or ditch; a small stream that frequently dries up in the summer.
    • A Scotch Winter Evening in 1512
      The wind made wave the red weed on the dike. bedoven in dank deep was every sike.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English siken, from Old English sīcan (to sigh), from Proto-Germanic *sīkaną (to sigh). Doublet of siche and sigh.

Verb[edit]

sike (third-person singular simple present sikes, present participle siking, simple past and past participle siked)

  1. (archaic or Northern England) To sigh or sob.

Noun[edit]

sike (plural sikes)

  1. (archaic or Northern England) A sigh.

Etymology 3[edit]

Variant of psych.

Interjection[edit]

sike

  1. (slang) Alternative form of psych

Anagrams[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Ziege.

Noun[edit]

sike

  1. goat

Manchu[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sike

  1. Romanization of ᠰᡳᡴᡝ

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic سِكَّة(sikka).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sike ?

  1. coin

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sike (present tense sik or sikar or siker, past tense seik or sika or sikt, supine sike or sika or sikt, past participle siken or sika or sikt, present participle sikande, imperative sik)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sike

  1. dative singular of sik