sigh

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sighen, syghen, syȝȝen, (also syken, sychen, syghten, etc.), from Old English sīcan (to sigh, moan, groan), from Proto-West Germanic *sīkan, perhaps ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *seykʷ- (to pour out). The Middle English infinitive forms in ȝ/gh are backformations of the past tense forms sighte, siȝhte, isiȝt, etc. Doublet of sike.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sigh (third-person singular simple present sighs, present participle sighing, simple past and past participle sighed)

  1. (intransitive) To inhale a larger quantity of air than usual, and immediately expel it; to make a deep single audible respiration, especially as the result or involuntary expression of fatigue, exhaustion, grief, sorrow, frustration, or the like.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess[1]:
      A waiter brought his aperitif, which was a small scotch and soda, and as he sipped it gratefully he sighed.
         ‘Civilized,’ he said to Mr. Campion. ‘Humanizing.’ […] ‘Cigars and summer days and women in big hats with swansdown face-powder, that's what it reminds me of.’
    When she saw it wasn't damaged, she sighed with relief.
    He sighed. It was going to be a long night.
    He sighed over the lost opportunity.
  2. (intransitive) To lament; to grieve.
  3. (transitive) To utter sighs over; to lament or mourn over.
    • 1695, Matthew Prior, An ode presented to the king, on His Majesty's arrival in Holland, after the Queen's death
      Ages to come, and men unborn, / Shall bless her name, and sigh her fate.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      The lassie had grace given her to refuse, but with a woeful heart, and Heriotside rode off in black discontent, leaving poor Ailie to sigh her love. He came back the next day and the next, but aye he got the same answer.
  4. (intransitive) To make a sound like sighing.
  5. (transitive) To exhale (the breath) in sighs.
    She sighed a sigh that was nearly a groan.
    sigh a note and sing a note
  6. (transitive) To express by sighs; to utter in or with sighs.
    "I guess I have no choice," she sighed.
    She sighed her frustrations.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

sigh (plural sighs)

  1. A deep, prolonged audible inhale and exhale of breath; as when fatigued, frustrated, grieved, or relieved; the act of sighing.
    • 1913, Eleanor Porter, Pollyanna, Chapter 7:
      To Pollyanna the air was all the more stifling after that cool breath of the out of doors; but she did not complain. She only drew a long quivering sigh.
  2. Figuratively, a manifestation of grief; a lament.
  3. (Cockney rhyming slang) A person who is bored.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Interjection[edit]

sigh

  1. An expression of fatigue, exhaustion, grief, sorrow, frustration, or the like, often used in casual written contexts.
    Sigh, I'm so bored at work today.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]