vast

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See also: VAST and väst

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French vaste, from Latin vastus (void, immense).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vast (comparative vaster or more vast, superlative vastest or most vast)

  1. Very large or wide (literally or figuratively).
    The Sahara desert is vast.
    There is a vast difference between them.
  2. Very great in size, amount, degree, intensity, or especially extent.
    • 1658, Thomas Browne, “The Garden of Cyrus. Or, The Quincunciall, Lozenge, or Net-work Plantations of the Ancients, Artificially, Naturally, Mystically Considered. Chapter III.”, in Hydriotaphia, Urne-buriall, or, A Discourse of the Sepulchrall Urnes Lately Found in Norfolk. Together with The Garden of Cyrus, or The Quincunciall, Lozenge, or Net-work Plantations of the Ancients, Artificially, Naturally, Mystically Considered. With Sundry Observations, London: Printed for Hen[ry] Brome at the Signe of the Gun in Ivy-lane, OCLC 48702491; reprinted as Hydriotaphia (The English Replicas), New York, N.Y.: Payson & Clarke Ltd., 1927, OCLC 78413388, page 136:
      The exiguity and ſmallneſſe of ſome ſeeds extending to large productions is one of the magnalities of nature, ſomewhat illuſtrating the work of the Creation, and vaſt production from nothing.
    • 2012 March-April, Anna Lena Phillips, “Sneaky Silk Moths”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 172:
      Last spring, the periodical cicadas emerged across eastern North America. Their vast numbers and short above-ground life spans inspired awe and irritation in humans—and made for good meals for birds and small mammals.
  3. (obsolete) Waste; desert; desolate; lonely.
    • William Shakespeare, the Life and Death of Richard the Third Act I, scene IV:
      the empty, vast, and wandering air

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

vast (plural vasts)

  1. (poetic) A vast space
    • 1608: they have seemed to be together, though absent, shook hands, as over a vast, and embraced, as it were, from the ends of opposed winds. — William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, I.i

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch vast, from Old Dutch fast, from Proto-Germanic *fastuz; see it for cognates and further etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vast (comparative vaster, superlative meest vast or vastst)

  1. firm, fast, tight
  2. fixed, not moving or changing
    vaste lasten
    fixed costs
  3. stuck, unable to get out
  4. (chemistry) in the solid state
  5. (botany) perennial
  6. (of a telephone) using a landline

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of vast
uninflected vast
inflected vaste
comparative vaster
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial vast vaster het vastst
het vastste
indefinite m./f. sing. vaste vastere vastste
n. sing. vast vaster vastste
plural vaste vastere vastste
definite vaste vastere vastste
partitive vasts vasters

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vast

  1. surely, certainly
  2. (informal, sarcastically) sure, yeah, right
    Mijn hond at mijn huiswerk.Ja, vast!
    My dog ate my homework. — Yeah, right!

Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

vast

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of vasten
  2. imperative of vasten

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Finno-Mordvinic or Finno-Volgaic origin. Cognate to Finnish vasta, Votic vassa, Northern Sami vuostá, Erzya вастомс (vastoms, to meet; to receive), Moksha васта (vasta, place; distance) and possibly Western Mari ваштареш (βaštareš, against; across).[1]

Adverb[edit]

vast

  1. maybe, possibly
  2. recently, just, now

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ vast in Metsmägi, Iris; Sedrik, Meeli; Soosaar, Sven-Erik (2012), Eesti etümoloogiasõnaraamat, Tallinn: Eesti Keele Instituut, →ISBN

Livonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Finnish vasten.

Preposition[edit]

vast

  1. against

Ludian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *vasta.

Noun[edit]

vast

  1. bundle (of switches for the sauna)

Romani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perhaps (unlikely, as the 'st' in Sanskrit would definitely have shifted to 'tt' or 't') from Sanskrit हस्त (hasta), from Proto-Indo-Iranian [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰés-to- (hand) < *ǵʰes-. Compare Punjabi ਹੱਥ (hatth), Hindi हाथ (hāth), Bengali হাত (hat); compare also Persian دست (dast).

Noun[edit]

vast m (plural vast)

  1. hand

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *vasta.

Noun[edit]

vast

  1. bundle (of switches for the sauna)