kalt

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Central Franconian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German *kald, northern variant of kalt, chalt. The variation between the stems kalt and kaal is due to the development -ald--āl-, which occurred only in open syllables.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kalt (masculine kaale, feminine kaal, comparative kaaler or kääler or kälder, superlative et kaalste or käälste or kältste)

  1. (most dialects) cold
    Loß’ mer heem john, ich hann kaal Föß.
    Let’s go home, my feet are cold.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The commoner comparation forms were originally kaaler, et kaalste. Today, those with umlaut are preferred due to influence of German kälter, am kältesten.

Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • khalt (Luserna, Sette Comuni)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German kalt, from Proto-West Germanic *kald.

Adjective[edit]

kalt

  1. (Tredici Comuni) cold

References[edit]

  • “kalt” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑlt

Verb[edit]

kalt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of kallen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of kallen

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kalt

  1. neuter nominative/accusative of kaldur

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German kalt, from Proto-West Germanic *kald.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kalt (comparative kälter, superlative am kältesten)

  1. cold, chilly; the physical perception of something (objects, weather, body etc.) to have a low temperature
  2. calm, restrained, passionless
  3. cold, frigid (especially when referring to emotions)

Usage notes[edit]

  • German kalt means “cold”, but not “feeling cold”; therefore the sentence ich bin kalt (literally I am cold) would mean that one’s body has a low temperature, particularly that one’s skin is cold on the outside. The English “I am cold” (that is: I feel cold) is equivalent to German mir ist kalt (literally there is cold to me).

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

kalt

  1. (of rent-paying) as base rent; excluding utilities
    Antonym: warm
    Ich zahle 550 € kalt für meine Wohnung.
    I pay €550 base rent for my apartment.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • kalt” in Duden online

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to hit, strike), cognates include Latin clādēs.[1] See the latter for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

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Verb[edit]

kalt (tr., 1st conj., pres. kaļu, kal, kaļ, past kalu)

  1. to forge
  2. to hammer
  3. to chisel
  4. to coin (money)
  5. to mint (money)
  6. to shoe (a horse)
  7. to peck (of a woodpecker)
  8. to hew

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “kalt”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

kalt

  1. past participle of kalle

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *kald, whence also Old Saxon kald, Old English cald, Old Norse kaldr, Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌻𐌳𐍃 (kalds).

Adjective[edit]

kalt

  1. cold

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German kalt. Compare German kalt, Dutch koud, English cold.

Adjective[edit]

kalt (comparative kelder, superlative keltscht)

  1. cold