dúr

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See also: dur, Dur, DUR, dùr, dûr, dür, and Dür

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dʰew-r-, cognate with Russian дурь (durʹ), Ukrainian дур (dur), дура (dura). See dúra.

Noun[edit]

dúr m (genitive singular dúrs, nominative plural dúrar)

  1. nap (short period of sleep)
  2. a short break
  3. a short while
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Danish dur, from Latin dūrus (hard).

Noun[edit]

dúr m (genitive singular dúrs, nominative plural dúrar)

  1. (music) a major key or scale
Declension[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish dúr, from Latin dūrus (hard).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dúr (genitive singular masculine dúir, genitive singular feminine dúire, plural dúra, comparative dúire)

  1. (literary) hard
    1. rigid, solid
    2. hardy, tough
    3. difficult
    4. hard to bear
    5. unfeeling
  2. dour, grim, obstinate
  3. dense, stupid
  4. sluggish

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dúr dhúr ndúr
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • 1 dúr” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “dúr” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • "dúr" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Middle Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin dūrus (hard).

Adjective[edit]

dúr (comparative dúru, superlative duirem)

  1. rigid, hard, solid
  2. difficult
  3. hard to bear
  4. strict, austere
  5. hardy, resolute
  6. unfeeling, dour, obdurate

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1 dúr” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.