grim

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Grim

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English grim.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grim (comparative grimmer, superlative grimmest)

  1. dismal and gloomy, cold and forbidding
    Life was grim in many northern industrial towns.
  2. rigid and unrelenting
    His grim determination enabled him to win.
  3. ghastly or sinister
    A grim castle overshadowed the village.
    • 2012 March 22, Scott Tobias, “The Hunger Games”, in AV Club:
      In movie terms, it suggests Paul Verhoeven in Robocop/Starship Troopers mode, an R-rated bloodbath where the grim spectacle of children murdering each other on television is bread-and-circuses for the age of reality TV, enforced by a totalitarian regime to keep the masses at bay.
  4. (UK, slang) disgusting; gross
    Wanna see the dead rat I found in my fridge? —Mate, that is grim!

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Danish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grim (neuter grimt, definite and plural grimme, comparative grimmere, superlative grimmest)

  1. ugly, unsightly
  2. nasty

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *grimmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ghrem- (to thunder). Cognate with Old Saxon grim, Old High German grim (German grimm, grimmig), Old Norse grimmr (Danish grim), Swedish grym; and with Greek χρεμίζω (chremízo), Old Church Slavonic грьмѣти (grĭměti) (Russian греметь (gremetʹ)), Latvian gremt. Perhaps related in Old Norse to veiled or hooded, Grim is also an alternate name for Odin, who often went around disguised, compare the hooded appearance of The Grim Reaper.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grim

  1. fierce, severe, terrible

Declension[edit]