grim

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Grim and -grim-

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹɪm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English grim, from Old English grimm, from Proto-West Germanic *grimm, from Proto-Germanic *grimmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrem- (to resound, thunder, grumble, roar).

Adjective[edit]

grim (comparative grimmer, superlative grimmest)

  1. Dismal and gloomy, cold and forbidding.
    Life was grim in many northern industrial towns.
    • 2019 August 30, Jonathan Watts, “Amazon fires show world heading for point of no return, says UN”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Cristiana Paşca Palmer, the executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, said the destruction of the world’s biggest rainforest was a grim reminder that a fresh approach needed to stabilise the climate and prevent ecosystems from declining to a point of no return, with dire consequences for humanity.
    • 2022 January 12, Nigel Harris, “Comment: Unhappy start to 2022”, in RAIL, number 948, page 3:
      It's been a grim start to the year.
  2. Rigid and unrelenting.
    His grim determination enabled him to win.
  3. Ghastly or sinister.
    A grim castle overshadowed the village.
    • 2012 March 22, Scott Tobias, “The Hunger Games”, in AV Club:
      In movie terms, it suggests Paul Verhoeven in Robocop/Starship Troopers mode, an R-rated bloodbath where the grim spectacle of children murdering each other on television is bread-and-circuses for the age of reality TV, enforced by a totalitarian regime to keep the masses at bay.
  4. Disgusting; gross.
    – Wanna see the dead rat I found in my fridge?
    – Mate, that is grim!
  5. (obsolete) Fierce, cruel, furious.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

grim (third-person singular simple present grims, present participle grimming, simple past and past participle grimmed)

  1. (transitive, rare) To make grim; to give a stern or forbidding aspect to.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English grim, grym, greme, from Old English *grimu, *grimmu, grima, from Proto-Germanic *grimmį̄ (anger, wrath), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrem- (to resound, thunder, grumble, roar). Cognate with Middle Dutch grimme, Middle High German grimme f (anger), modern German Grimm m.

Noun[edit]

grim (countable and uncountable, plural grims)

  1. (obsolete) Anger, wrath.
  2. (obsolete) A specter, ghost, haunting spirit.
Derived terms[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse grimmr, from Proto-Germanic *grimmaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grim

  1. ugly, unsightly
  2. nasty

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of grim
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular grim grimmere grimmest2
Neuter singular grimt grimmere grimmest2
Plural grimme grimmere grimmest2
Definite attributive1 grimme grimmere grimmeste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Kalasha[edit]

Verb[edit]

grim

  1. taking

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse grimmr, from Proto-Germanic *grimmaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grim (masculine and feminine grim, neuter grimt, definite singular and plural grimme, comparative grimmare, superlative grimmast, definite superlative grimmaste)

  1. grim, ugly, unsightly
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse grímr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grim m (definite singular grimen, indefinite plural grimar, definite plural grimane)

  1. (folklore) a kind of wight
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

grim

  1. imperative of grime

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grim

  1. Alternative form of grimm

Declension[edit]