cruel

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English, from Old French, from Latin crūdēlis ‎(hard, severe, cruel), akin to crūdus ‎(raw, crude); see crude.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cruel ‎(comparative crueler or crueller or more cruel, superlative cruelest or cruellest or most cruel)

  1. Not nice; mean; heartless.
    The supervisor was very cruel to Josh, as he would always give Josh the hardest, most degrading work he could find.
  2. (slang) Cool; awesome; neat.

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Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cruel ‎(third-person singular simple present cruels, present participle cruelling, simple past and past participle cruelled)

  1. (chiefly Australia, New Zealand) To spoil or ruin (one's chance of success)
    • 1937, Vance Palmer, Legend for Sanderson, Sydney: Angus & Robertson, p. 226, [1]
      What cruelled him was that Imperial Hotel contract.
    • 2014, The Sydney Morning Herald, 1 April, 2014, [2]
      He was on the fringes of Test selection last year before a shoulder injury cruelled his chances.
    • 2015, The Age, 8 September, 2015, [3]
      A shortage of berth space for mega container ships will restrict capacity at Melbourne's port, cruelling Labor's attempts to get maximum value from its privatisation, a leading shipping expert has warned.
  2. (Australia) To violently provoke (a child) in the belief that this will make them more assertive.
    • 2007, Stewart Motha, "Reconciliation as Domination" in Scott Veitch (ed.), Law and the Politics of Reconciliation, Routledge, 2016, p. 83, [4]
      Violence is apparently introduced early by the practice of "cruelling": children even in their first months are physically punished and then encouraged to seek retribution by punishing the punisher.
    • 2009, Mark Colvin, ABC, "Peter Sutton discusses the politics of suffering in Aboriginal communities," 2 July, 2009, [5]
      [] I was referring to the area where you were talking about this practice of cruelling; the pinching of babies, sometimes so hard that their skin breaks and may go septic.

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Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin crūdēlis.

Adjective[edit]

cruel (epicene, plural crueles)

  1. cruel

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin crūdēlis.

Adjective[edit]

cruel m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural cruels)

  1. cruel

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin crūdēlis. Compare also the Old French form crual, possibly from a Vulgar Latin form *crudalis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cruel m ‎(feminine singular cruelle, masculine plural cruels, feminine plural cruelles)

  1. cruel
  2. hard, painful

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Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin crūdēlis.

Adjective[edit]

cruel m, f (plural crueis)

  1. cruel

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Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cruel

  1. cruel

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese cruel, from Latin crūdēlis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cruel ‎(plural cruéis, comparable)

  1. cruel

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Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin crūdēlis.

Adjective[edit]

cruel m, f ‎(plural crueles)

  1. cruel

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