austere

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See also: austère

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek αὐστηρός ‎(austērós, bitter, harsh), having the specific meaning "making the tongue dry" (originally used of fruits, wines), related to αὔω ‎(aúō, to singe), αὖος ‎(aûos, dry).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

austere ‎(comparative austerer or more austere, superlative austerest or most austere)

  1. Grim or severe in manner or appearance
    The headmistress was an austere old woman.
  2. Lacking trivial decoration; not extravagant or gaudy
    The interior of the church was as austere as the parishioners were dour.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

austere f pl

  1. feminine plural of austero

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

austēre

  1. vocative masculine singular of austērus

Latvian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

austere f (5th declension)

  1. oyster

Declension[edit]

Quotations[edit]

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Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin austērus.

Adjective[edit]

austere m, f (plural austeres)

  1. austere; severe

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin austērus.

Adjective[edit]

austere m, f

  1. (of a flavor) acrid; bitter
  2. austere; severe