dur

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Dur, DUR, dúr, dùr, dûr, dür, Dür, and дур

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

German Dur, from Latin dūrus (hard, firm, vigorous).

Adjective[edit]

dur (not comparable)

  1. (music, obsolete) Major; in the major mode.
    C dur

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for dur in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin dūrus, from Proto-Indo-European *deru-, *drew- (hard, fast).

Adjective[edit]

dur (feminine dura, masculine plural durs, feminine plural dures)

  1. hard (resistant to pressure)
    Antonym: tou
  2. difficult
    Synonym: difícil
    Antonym: fàcil
Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin dūcere, present active infinitive of dūcō, from Proto-Italic *doukō, from Proto-Indo-European *déwketi, from the root *dewk-.

Verb[edit]

dur (first-person singular present duc, past participle dut)

  1. (transitive) to carry
    Synonym: portar
  2. (transitive) to bring
    Synonym: portar
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dāre, present active infinitive of .

Verb[edit]

dur (first-person singular present da, past participle dut)

  1. to give

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

dur

  1. (music) major

Antonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Latin dūrus, from Proto-Indo-European *deru-, *drew- (hard, fast).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dyʁ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -yʁ

Adjective[edit]

dur (feminine singular dure, masculine plural durs, feminine plural dures)

  1. hard, tough (difficult to penetrate)
  2. hard (not soft)
  3. hard, tough (not easy, difficult)
  4. harsh (e.g. harsh conditions)
  5. (art) harsh (of a penstroke)

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

dur

  1. hard
    travailler durto work hard

Noun[edit]

dur m (plural durs)

  1. firmness, solidity

dur m (plural durs, feminine dure)

  1. hard case (tough person)

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dur (comparative plus dur, superlative le plus dur)

  1. hard, not soft [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sexton, B. C. (2019) English-Interlingua: A Basic Vocabulary[1], Union Mundial pro Interlingua, →ISBN

Kalasha[edit]

Noun[edit]

dur (Arabic دوُر‎)

  1. house
    Synonyms: abadi, khatumán, ku, kuš

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

dur

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of durt
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of durt
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of durt
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of durt
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of durt
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of durt

Lombard[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • dür (Modern orthography)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dūrus, from Proto-Italic *dūros, from Proto-Indo-European *duh₂-ró-s (long), from *dweh₂- (far, long). Cognate with Ancient Greek δηρός (dērós, long), Sanskrit दूर (dūrá, distant, far, long).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dur m (feminine singular dura, masculine and feminine plural dur) (Classical Milanese orthography)

  1. hard
  2. tough, harsh
  3. (of food) stringy

References[edit]

  • Francesco Cherubini, Vocabolario milanese-italiano, Volume 2, 1843, p. 58

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dūrus, from Proto-Indo-European *deru-, *drew- (hard, fast). Attested from the 12th century.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dur m (feminine singular dura, masculine plural durs, feminine plural duras)

  1. hard (resistant to pressure)
  2. difficult

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2016, page 211.

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *durь.

Noun[edit]

dur m inan

  1. (medicine) One of several bacterial diseases:
    dur brzusznytyphoid fever
    dur plamistyepidemic typhus
    dur powrotnyrelapsing fever
    dur rzekomyparatyphoid fever
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin dūrus.

Noun[edit]

dur m inan (indeclinable)

  1. (music) major (scale)
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dur in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • dur in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit दूर (dūrá), from Proto-Indo-Aryan *duHrás, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *duHrás, from Proto-Indo-European *duh₂-ró-s, from *dweh₂- (far, long). Cognate with Hindi दूर (dūr), Kamkata-viri bādūř, Persian دور(dūr).

Adverb[edit]

dur

  1. far

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dūrus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dur m or n (feminine singular dură, masculine plural duri, feminine and neuter plural dure)

  1. hard, tough
  2. rough, harsh, severe

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Sursurunga[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dur

  1. dirty

Further reading[edit]

  • Sursurunga Organised Phonology Data (2011)
  • Don Hutchisson, Sursurunga grammar essentials (1975)

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dur c

  1. (music) major scale

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Turkish stop sign

Verb[edit]

dur

  1. stop (imperative)

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin dūrus (hard).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dur m (uncountable)

  1. steel

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dur ddur nur unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “dur”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse dúr m.

Noun[edit]

dur

  1. Short slumber.
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Irish dobhar, Welsh dŵr (water,) Old Norse úr (drizzle.)

Noun[edit]

dur

  1. Fog.
Synonyms[edit]