amor

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See also: Amor and amôr

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor (plural amors)

  1. Alternative form of amour
    • 1775, Robert Jephson, “The Hotel”, in Braganza. A Tragedy. [], Dublin: [] Messrs. Exshaw, Sleater, Potts, Chamberlaine, Williams, Wilson, Husband, Porter, Walker, Jenkin, Flyn, and Hillary, page 41; republished as “The Hotel”, in The English and American Stage, volume VI, New York, N.Y.: [] David Longworth, [], 1807, act II, scene II, pages 31–32:
      Don Ped. That all the care I took of myself should be thrown away—never exposing myself to the night air; never fatiguing myself beyond a gentle perspiration, so careful of my diet, so regular in my hours, so chaste in my amors [originally amours], and after all this, in the evening of my days to have a long spado run through my guts, and look like a blue-breech’d fly with a corking pin sticking in it!
    • 1810 September, “Gil Blas [] a fine gentleman”, in The Adventures of Gil Blas, of Santillane, Abridged, Leominster: [] Salmon Wilder, for Isaiah Thomas, Jun., page 70:
      In this manner I succeed in my amors, and would advise thee to take the same method.
    • 1845 April, Ned Buntline, “A Night-Adventure in Cuba”, in The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, volume XXV, number 4, New York, N.Y.: [] John Allen, [], page 326:
      Dulce, will you go to the masquerade-ball to night?’ said I to my lesser-half, on a bright evening during the gayest part of the ‘carnival season.’ / ‘No, my amor,’ answered she; ‘I am ill this evening; do n’t go out to-night, but stay by my side, and let your cheering presence save a doctor’s fee.’
    • 1905, Havelock Ellis, Studies in the Psychology of Sex: Sexual Selection in Man, page 240:
      But even in the midst of my love affairs I always retained sufficient sense to criticise the moral and intellectual calibre of the women I loved, and I held strong views on the advisability of mental and moral sympathies and congenial tastes existing between people who married. In my amors I had hitherto found no intellectual equality or sympathies.
    • 1981, Katherine Yorke, Falcon Gold, Pinnacle Books, →ISBN, page 247:
      The late Queen was a model in this respect about the amors of His Majesty, even allowing his mistresses to become her ladies-in-waiting.
    • 1991, M. C. Beaton, His Lordship’s Pleasure (The Regency Intrigue Series), New York, N.Y.: RosettaBooks, published 2011, →ISBN:
      “Imply once more that I am of that breed who prefer amors with their own sex and I shall blow your head off,” he said levelly. [] But he was merely an accomplished flirt and she was the impoverished Mrs. Carruthers, married to a drunk and a wastrel, and had spent a precious part of the evening allowing herself to be questioned about the amors of a rake by a silly girl. [] I do not like to broadcast my amors about the town.
    • 2003, Sting, Broken Music: A Memoir, New York, N.Y.: The Dial Press, →ISBN, page 123:
      The years of safe sex and condoms being years hence, we live with a libertine fatalism and I’m too ignorant and horny to calibrate my amors to the female cycle.

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor, amōre.

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan amor, from Latin amōre, singular ablative of amor. Attested from the 12th century.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amors)

  1. love
    Antonym: odi

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “amor” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Chavacano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish amor (love).

Noun[edit]

amor

  1. love

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese amor, from Latin amor, amōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love
    Antonym: odio
  2. love, darling
    • O meu amor mariñeiro (1981), song by L. Álvarez Pousa and Xosé L. Rivas (Fuxan os Ventos):
      Meu amor é mariñeiro
      e vive no alto mar;
      son os seus brazos o vento
      ninguén llos pode amarrar
      My love is a sailor
      and he lives in the high sea;
      his arms are the wind:
      no one can moor them

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  • amor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • amor” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • amor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • amor” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • amor” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin amor.

Noun[edit]

amor m (genitive singular amors, no plural)

  1. (rare) love

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor.

Noun[edit]

amor

  1. love

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (invariable)

  1. Apocopic form of amore

Anagrams[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (Latin spelling)

  1. love

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From amō (I love) +‎ -or.

Noun[edit]

amor m (genitive amōris); third declension

  1. love, affection, devotion (for a person, one's family, one's country)
    amor alicuius / in aliquem / erga aliquemlove for somebody
    • 70 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Eclogae 10.69:
      Omnia vincit amor: et nos cedamus amori.
      Love defeats everything, and even we must give in to love.
      Love conquers all; and we must yield to Love. (transl. by John Dryden)
    • 100 BCE – 44 BCE, Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico 1.20:
      [dixit] sese tamen et amore fraterno et existimatione vulgi commoveri.
      [Divitiacus said] that, moreover, he was motivated by love for his brother and the common people's affection.
  2. love, desire, craving
    amor laudumdesire for praises/glory
    • 106 BCE – 43 BCE, Cicero, De Finibus 5.48:
      Tantus est igitur innatus in nobis cognitionis amor et scientiae, ut nemo dubitare possit quin, ad eas res hominum, natura nullo emolumento invitata rapiatur.
      And so, the desire for understanding and knowledge is so great, no one can doubt that, in human topics, there's a way to dissuade human nature from attainment (of knowledge).
  3. beloved, loved person
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Metamorphoses 1.452-453:
      Primus amor Phoebi Daphne Peneia, quem non fors / ignara dedit, sed saeva Cupidinis ira.
      Phoebus' first love was Daphne the Penean, which accidental luck did not give (to him), but rather Cupid's fierce anger.
  4. sex
    • 29 BCE, Virgil, Georgica 3.242-244:
      Omne adeo genus in terris hominumque ferarumque
      et genus aequoreum, pecudes pictaeque uolucres,
      in furias ignemque ruunt: amor omnibus idem.
      Thus everywhere every type of people and beasts,
      whether those of water, livestock, or those portrayed flying,
      are ruined into fury and fire: sex is the same to all.
  5. (in the plural) love, sweetheart (term of endearment)
  6. (plural only) love affair
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, 7 :
      aut quam sidera multa, cum tacet nox, / furtivos hominum vident amores: / tam te basia multa basiare / vesano satis et super Catullo'st
      or as many as the stars, when the night is silent, watching people's secret love affairs: for you to kiss these many kisses / would be more than enough for frenzied Catullus...
  7. the god Cupid
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Remedia Amoris 1.1-2:
      Legerat huius Amor titulum nomenque libelli: 'Bella mihi, video, bella parantur' ait.
      Cupid read the title and name of this little book [The Cure for Love], and said, "War, I see war is being prepared for, against me."
Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative amor amōrēs
Genitive amōris amōrum
Dative amōrī amōribus
Accusative amōrem amōrēs
Ablative amōre amōribus
Vocative amor amōrēs
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of amō (I love).

Verb[edit]

amor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of amō, "I am loved"

References[edit]

  • amor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • amor in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • amor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • amor in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden, Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co., 1894
    • to feel affection for a person: in amore habere aliquem
    • to feel affection for a person: amore prosequi, amplecti aliquem
    • to be fired with love: amore captum, incensum, inflammatum esse, ardere
    • to banish love from one's mind: amorem ex animo eicere
    • somebody's darling: amores et deliciae alicuius
    • to be some one's favourite: in amore et deliciis esse alicui (active in deliciis habere aliquem)
  • amor in Harry Thurston Peck, editor, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1898
  • amor in William Smith, editor, A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray, 1848

Anagrams[edit]


Leonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amorem, accusative singular form of amor.

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan amor, from Latin amor, amōrem. Attested from the 12th century.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amors)

  1. love

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2016, page {{{1}}}.

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor, amōrem.

Noun[edit]

amor m or f (oblique plural amors, nominative singular amors, nominative plural amor)

  1. love

Usage notes[edit]

  • Attestable as both a masculine and a feminine noun, sometimes both in the same text
  • Often capitalized because of the perceived importance of the word

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor, amōrem.

Noun[edit]

amor m (oblique plural amors, nominative singular amors, nominative plural amor)

  1. love
    • c. 1160, Raimbaut d'Aurenga, vers:
      Assatz sai d’amor ben parlar [...].
      Well I know how to speak of love.

Descendants[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor (love), amōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m

  1. love

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese amor, from Latin amor, amōrem, from amō (I love).

Cognate with Galician amor, Spanish amor, Catalan amor, Occitan amor, French amour, Italian amore and Romanian amor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love
  2. (figuratively, endearing) honey (term of endearing)
    Amor, cheguei.
    Honey, I'm home.
    Synonym: querido
  3. (figuratively) a kind or humble person
    Ele é um amor.
    He is a lovely person.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin amor, borrowed from French amour, borrowed from Italian amore.

Noun[edit]

amor n (plural amoruri)

  1. love

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amōrem, singular accusative of amor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love
    Antonyms: odio, desamor
  2. love affair

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]