amor

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See also: Amor and amôr

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor, amōre.

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan amor, from Latin amōre, singular ablative of amor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amors)

  1. love
    Antonym: odi

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Chavacano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish amor (love).

Noun[edit]

amor

  1. love

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese amor, from Latin amor, amōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin amor.

Noun[edit]

amor m (genitive singular amors, no plural)

  1. (rare) love

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor.

Noun[edit]

amor

  1. love

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (invariable)

  1. Apocopic form of amore

Anagrams[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (Latin spelling)

  1. love

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From amō (I love) +‎ -or.

Noun[edit]

amor m (genitive amōris); third declension

  1. love
    Amor omnia vincit.
    Love conquers all.
  2. beloved
  3. sex
    • 29 bc. Vergil. Georgics, III
      amor omnibvs idem
      Sex is the same for all of them [viz., every form of man, beast, aquatic or winged life, or livestock]
  4. (plural only) love affair
Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative amor amōrēs
Genitive amōris amōrum
Dative amōrī amōribus
Accusative amōrem amōrēs
Ablative amōre amōribus
Vocative amor amōrēs
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of amō (I love).

Verb[edit]

amor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of amō

References[edit]

  • amor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • amor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • amor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • amor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to feel affection for a person: in amore habere aliquem
    • to feel affection for a person: amore prosequi, amplecti aliquem
    • to be fired with love: amore captum, incensum, inflammatum esse, ardere
    • to banish love from one's mind: amorem ex animo eicere
    • somebody's darling: amores et deliciae alicuius
    • to be some one's favourite: in amore et deliciis esse alicui (active in deliciis habere aliquem)
  • amor in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • amor in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Leonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan amor, from Latin amor, amōrem.

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amors)

  1. love

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor, amōrem.

Noun[edit]

amor m, f (oblique plural amors, nominative singular amors, nominative plural amor)

  1. love

Usage notes[edit]

  • Attestable as both a masculine and a feminine noun, sometimes both in the same text
  • Often capitalized because of the perceived importance of the word

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor, amōrem.

Noun[edit]

amor m (oblique plural amors, nominative singular amors, nominative plural amor)

  1. love
    • c. 1160, Raimbaut d'Aurenga, vers:
      Assatz sai d’amor ben parlar [...].
      Well I know how to speak of love.

Descendants[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amor (love), amōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m

  1. love

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese amor, from Latin amor, amōrem, from amō (I love).

Cognate with Galician amor, Spanish amor, Catalan amor, Occitan amor, French amour, Italian amore and Romanian amor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love
  2. honey (term of affection)
    Amor, cheguei.
    Honey, I'm home.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin amor, borrowed from French amour, borrowed from Italian amore.

Noun[edit]

amor n (plural amoruri)

  1. love

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amōrem, singular accusative of amor.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈmoɾ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -oɾ

Noun[edit]

amor m (plural amores)

  1. love
  2. love affair

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]