libido

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin libīdō ‎(lust, desire). Used originally in psychoanalytic contexts.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

libido ‎(countable and uncountable, plural libidos)

  1. (common usage) Sexual urges or drives.
    Good grief man, control your libido!
  2. (psychology) Drives or mental energies related to or based on sexual instincts but not necessarily sexual in and of themselves.
    For Freudians, libido means the desire to "unite and bind" with objects in the world.
    The ego as an organ which seeks to synthesize thoughts in the psyche is said to be driven by libido or eros.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin libīdō

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

libido f

  1. libido

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

libido f ‎(invariable)

  1. (psychoanalysis) libido

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

libīdō f ‎(genitive libīdinis); third declension

  1. pleasure, inclination, fancy, longing
  2. caprice, passion, wantonness
  3. lust, sensuality
    • c. 4 BCE – 65 CE, Seneca the Younger, De brevitate vitae 7
      In primis autem et illos numero qui nulli rei nisi uino ac libidini uacant; nulli enim turpius occupati sunt.
      But among the worst I count also those who have time for nothing but wine and lust; for none have more shameful engrossments.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative libīdō libīdinēs
genitive libīdinis libīdinum
dative libīdinī libīdinibus
accusative libīdinem libīdinēs
ablative libīdine libīdinibus
vocative libīdō libīdinēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • libido in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • libido in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • libido in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • anger is defined as a passionate desire for revenge: iracundiam sic (ita) definiunt, ut ulciscendi libidinem esse dicant or ut u. libido sit or iracundiam sic definiunt, ulc. libidinem
    • to be carried away by one's passions: libidine ferri
    • to abandon oneself (entirely) to debauchery: se (totum) libidinibus dedere
    • to bridle one's desires: refrenare cupiditates, libidines
    • to arouse some one's lust: libidinem alicuius excitare
    • the passions win the day: libido dominatur (Or. 65. 219)
    • the storm of passion has abated: libido consēdit

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

libido f (plural libidos)

  1. (psychology) libido (sexual urges or drives)
  2. (psychology) libido (drives based on sexual instincts)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin libīdō

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lǐbido/
  • Hyphenation: li‧bi‧do

Noun[edit]

lìbido m ‎(Cyrillic spelling лѝбидо)

  1. libido

Declension[edit]

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Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin libīdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

líbido m inan ‎(genitive líbida, nominative plural líbidi)

  1. libido

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /li.ˈbi.do/, [li.ˈβi.ðo]

Noun[edit]

libido m ‎(plural libidos)

  1. libido, sex drive