libido

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See also: Libido and libidó

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin libīdō (lust, desire). Used originally in psychoanalytic contexts.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /lɪˈbiː.dəʊ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːdəʊ

Noun[edit]

libido (countable and uncountable, plural libidos)

  1. (common usage) Sexual urges or drives.
    Synonym: horniness (vulgar)
    Antonym: boredom
    Good grief man, control your libido!
    • 1991, “Smells Like Teen Spirit”, in Nevermind, performed by Nirvana:
      A mulatto, an albino / A mosquito, my libido
  2. (psychology) Drives or mental energies related to or based on sexual instincts but not necessarily sexual in and of themselves.
    Antonym: destrudo
    Hypernym: drive
    For Freudians, libido means the desire to "unite and bind" with objects in the world.
    The ego as an organ which seeks to synthesize thoughts in the psyche is said to be driven by libido or eros.
  3. (astronomy, archaic or misused, an occasional carry-over from astrology to astronomy) Synonym of albedo in terms of a planet's, such as that of Mars, average surface spectral reflectivity.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin libīdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

libido f (usually uncountable, plural libidos)

  1. libido

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

libido f (invariable)

  1. (psychoanalysis) libido

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

libīdō f (genitive libīdinis); third declension

  1. pleasure, inclination, fancy, longing
  2. caprice, passion, wantonness
    • 55 BCE, Cicero, De Oratore 3.1:
      haec tibi est incidenda lingua, quā vel ēvulsa spīritū ipsō libīdinem tuam lībertās mea refūtābit.
      (For that) you must sever this tongue of mine, and even if it is torn out, the freedom in my very breath will confound your wantonness.
  3. lust, sensuality
    Libīdō vincit omnia.
    Lust fetters everything.
    • c. 4 BCE – 65 CE, Seneca the Younger, De brevitate vitae 7:
      In prīmīs autem et illōs numerō quī nūllī reī nisi vīnō ac libīdinī vacant; nūllī enim turpius occupātī sunt.
      But among the worst I count also those who have time for nothing but wine and lust; for none have more shameful engrossments.
    • 121 CE, Suetonius, De vita Caesarum 3.44:
      Maiōre adhūc ac turpiōre īnfāmiā flagrāvit, vix ut referrī audīrīve, nēdum crēdī fās sit, quasi puerōs prīmae teneritūdinis, quōs pisciculōs vocābat, īnstitueret, ut natantī sibi inter femina versārentur ac lūderent linguā morsūque sēnsim adpetentēs; atque etiam quasi īnfantēs firmiōrēs, necdum tamen lacte dēpulsōs, inguinī ceu papillae admovēret, prōnior sānē ad id genus libīdinis et nātūrā et aetāte.
      He was excited with a greater and more shameful infamy, that hardly can be told or heard, by no means be believed to be allowed by the gods, like how he trained little boys of the tenderest age, which he called 'little fish', to go around between his thighs and rouse his senses with the tongue and by biting, while he was swimming; or even how he put stronger babies, not weaned yet, to his genitals as if to nipples, certainly more inclined to this kind of lechery by nature as well as by age.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative libīdō libīdinēs
Genitive libīdinis libīdinum
Dative libīdinī libīdinibus
Accusative libīdinem libīdinēs
Ablative libīdine libīdinibus
Vocative libīdō libīdinēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: libido
  • French: libido
  • Italian: libido
  • Russian: либи́до (libído)
  • Spanish: libido

References[edit]

  • libido in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • libido in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • libido in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • anger is defined as a passionate desire for revenge: iracundiam sic (ita) definiunt, ut ulciscendi libidinem esse dicant or ut u. libido sit or iracundiam sic definiunt, ulc. libidinem
    • to be carried away by one's passions: libidine ferri
    • to abandon oneself (entirely) to debauchery: se (totum) libidinibus dedere
    • to bridle one's desires: refrenare cupiditates, libidines
    • to arouse some one's lust: libidinem alicuius excitare
    • the passions win the day: libido dominatur (Or. 65. 219)
    • the storm of passion has abated: libido consēdit

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

libido f (plural libidos)

  1. (psychology) libido (sexual urges or drives)
  2. (psychology) libido (drives based on sexual instincts)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin libīdō

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lǐbido/
  • Hyphenation: li‧bi‧do

Noun[edit]

lìbido m (Cyrillic spelling лѝбидо)

  1. libido

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin libīdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lȋbido m inan

  1. libido

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. líbido
gen. sing. líbida
singular dual plural
nominative líbido líbida líbidi
accusative líbido líbida líbide
genitive líbida líbidov líbidov
dative líbidu líbidoma líbidom
locative líbidu líbidih líbidih
instrumental líbidom líbidoma líbidi

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin libīdo.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /liˈbido/, [liˈβiðo]
    There is a certain tendency to pronounce libido as /'li.bi.do/ due to the influence of lívido, but this pronounciation is incorrect according to the Spanish orthography and thus not recommended.[2]
  • Rhymes: -iðo
  • Hyphenation: li‧bi‧do

Noun[edit]

libido f (plural libidos)

  1. libido, sex drive

References[edit]

  1. ^ libido” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.
  2. ^ "libido" in Diccionario panhispánico de dudas