cupido

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See also: Cupido

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From cupiō (I desire).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kuˈpiː.doː/, [kʊˈpiː.d̪oː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /kuˈpi.do/, [kuˈpiː.d̪ɔ]
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Noun[edit]

cupīdō f (genitive cupīdinis); third declension

  1. desire, longing, especially amorous desire
  2. lust, passion, greed
    cupīdō caecablind ambition
Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cupīdō cupīdinēs
Genitive cupīdinis cupīdinum
Dative cupīdinī cupīdinibus
Accusative cupīdinem cupīdinēs
Ablative cupīdine cupīdinibus
Vocative cupīdō cupīdinēs

Usage notes[edit]

According to scholars such as Döderlein, the difference between cupīdō and cupiditās is that cupīdō is seen as active desire, whereas cupiditās is more of a passive desire of passion that befalls someone as a state of mind. Cupīdō consists of especially desire for possessions, money or power. Cupiditas is used as desire for goods of any kind.

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cupidō

  1. dative masculine singular of cupidus
  2. dative neuter singular of cupidus
  3. ablative masculine singular of cupidus
  4. ablative neuter singular of cupidus
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • cupido in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cupido in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • cupido in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cupido in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

cupido m (plural cupidos)

  1. cupid