odi

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See also: Odi, ODI, Odi-, odî, òdi, óði, and øði

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin odium, possibly borrowed. Doublet of oi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

odi m (plural odis)

  1. hatred

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

odi m pl

  1. plural of odio

Noun[edit]

odi f pl

  1. plural of ode

Verb[edit]

odi

  1. inflection of udire:
    1. second-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Verb[edit]

odi

  1. inflection of odiare:
    1. second-person singular present indicative
    2. first/second/third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Late Latin, present tense) odiō
  • (Late Latin, perfect tense) ōdīvī

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *ōdai, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ed-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ōdī (present infinitive ōdisse, future participle ōsūrus); fourth conjugation, perfect forms have present meaning, no supine stem except in the future active participle

  1. to have an aversion towards, to hate, dislike
    • 23 BCE – 13 BCE, Horace, Odes 1.38.1–2:
      Persicōs ōdī, puer, apparātūs,
      displicent nexae philyrā corōnae.
      • Translation by A.Z. Foreman
        My boy: I hate the filigree of Persia.
        Linden-sewn garlands chafe me with their glamor.
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Exodus 20:5:
      Nōn adōrābis ea, neque colēs: ego sum Dominus Deus tuus fortis, zēlōtēs, vīsitāns inīquitātem patrum in fīliōs, in tertiam et quārtam generātiōnem eōrum quī ōdērunt mē.
      Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me.
  2. (with infinitive) to feel reluctant to, to hate to, to be loath to
    • 23 BCE – 13 BCE, Horace, Odes 2.16:
      Laetus in praesēns animus quod ultrā est
      ōderit cūrāre []
      And let the mind that's happy in the moment
      'Bout that which lies before be loath to worry

Usage notes[edit]

Irregular for historical reasons as well as to avoid near-homophony (especially for non-urban speakers) with forms of audeō and audiō:

  • Used to express a stative meaning, inheriting the Proto-Indo-European usage. As a result, no usual aspectual distinction (imperfect-perfect) is possible.
  • The perfect tense expresses a present stative meaning. The pluperfect expresses a past stative meaning.
  • Perōsus and exōsus are used in place of present active participles; ōsus is archaic in this function.
  • To express the passive meaning, various expressions with odium are mainly used.

The form odīvī, Classically a solecism, is attested already by the end of the Republic in the past aoristic function; in Late Latin, the imperfect odiō becomes common (see it for details), supplementing ōdī in the present, while perōsus and exōsus acquire the passive meaning.

Conjugation[edit]

   Conjugation of ōdī (fourth conjugation, no present stem, no supine stem except in the future active participle, active only, perfect forms as present, pluperfect as imperfect, future perfect as future)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present ōdī ōdistī ōdit ōdimus ōdistis ōdērunt,
ōdēre
imperfect ōderam ōderās ōderat ōderāmus ōderātis ōderant
future ōderō ōderis ōderit ōderimus ōderitis ōderint
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present ōderim ōderīs ōderit ōderīmus ōderītis ōderint
imperfect ōdissem ōdissēs ōdisset ōdissēmus ōdissētis ōdissent
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives ōdisse ōsūrum esse
participles ōsūrus

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Vulgar Latin: *odiō
    • Old Catalan: ujar
  • Borrowings:

References[edit]

  • ōdī” on page 1364 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)
  • Landgraf, Gustav (1884), “Das Defektivum 'odi' und sein Ersatz”, in Archiv für lateinische Lexicographie und Grammatik mit Einschluss des Älteren mittellateins[1]

Further reading[edit]

  • odi”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • odi”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • odi in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Latvian[edit]

Noun[edit]

odi m

  1. nominative plural form of ods
  2. vocative plural form of ods

Verb[edit]

odi

  1. 2nd person singular past indicative form of ost

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin odium.

Noun[edit]

odi

  1. hatred

Old High German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *auþī, from Proto-Germanic *auþijaz.

Adjective[edit]

ōdi

  1. empty, desolate, void
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *auþī, from Proto-Germanic *auþuz.

Adjective[edit]

ōdi

  1. easy, light
Derived terms[edit]

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English howdy.

Noun[edit]

odi

  1. A greeting; good wishes, regards

Interjection[edit]

odi

  1. greetings
    • ca. 1765, Pieter van Dyk, Nieuwe en nooit bevoorens geziene Onderwyzinge in het Bastert, of Neeger Engels, zoo als het zelve in de Hollandsze Colonien gebruikt word [New and unprecedented instruction in Bastard or Negro English, as it is used in the Dutch colonies]‎[2], Frankfurt/Madrid: Iberoamericana:
      Odi mijn heer hoe fa joe tan gran tanki fo myn heer a komi ja fo loeke da pranasie wan trom.
      Good day, Sir, how are you? Many thanks to Sir, (that) he has come here to look at the plantation on this occasion.

Derived terms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

odi

  1. accusative singular of od

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pet-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

odi (first-person singular present odaf)

  1. (literary) to snow
    Synonym: bwrw eira

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
odi unchanged unchanged hodi
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “odi”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies