feud

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fede, feide, *feithe, from Old English fǣhþ, fǣhþu, fǣhþo ‎(hostility, enmity, violence, revenge, vendetta), from Proto-Germanic *faihiþō ‎(hatred, enmity), from Proto-Indo-European *pAik-, *pAig- ‎(ill-meaning, wicked), equivalent to foe +‎ -th. Cognate with Dutch vete ‎(feud), German Fehde ‎(feud, vendetta), Danish fejde ‎(feud, enmity, hostility, war), Swedish fejd ‎(feud, controversy, quarrel, strife), and Old French faide, feide ‎(feud), ultimately from the same Germanic source. Related to foe, fiend.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

feud ‎(plural feuds)

  1. A state of long-standing mutual hostility.
    You couldn't call it a feud exactly, but there had always been a chill between Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods.
  2. (professional wrestling slang) A staged rivalry between wrestlers.
  3. (obsolete) A combination of kindred to avenge injuries or affronts, done or offered to any of their blood, on the offender and all his race.
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Translations[edit]
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Verb[edit]

feud ‎(third-person singular simple present feuds, present participle feuding, simple past and past participle feuded)

  1. (intransitive) To carry on a feud.
    The two men began to feud after one of them got a job promotion and the other thought he was more qualified.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French, from Latin feodum.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

feud ‎(plural feuds)

  1. An estate granted to a vassal by a feudal lord in exchange for service
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