sere

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: sére, seré, and Sêre

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English ser, sere, seare, seer, seere, seir, seyr (dry, withered; emaciated, shrivelled; brittle; bare; dead, lifeless; barren, useless),[1] from Old English sēar, sīere (dry, withered; barren; sere),[2] from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz (dry, parched), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂sews-, *sh₂ews- (to be dry). Cognate with Dutch zoor (dry and coarse), Greek αὖος (aὖos, dry), Lithuanian sausas (dry), Middle Low German sôr (Low German soor (arid, dry)), Old Church Slavonic suχŭ (suχŭ, dry),[2]. Doublet of sear and sare.

Adjective[edit]

sere (comparative serer, superlative serest)

  1. (archaic or literary, poetic) Without moisture; dry.
    Synonyms: sare (Britain, archaic), sear; see also Thesaurus:dry
  2. (obsolete) Of fabrics: threadbare, worn out.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin serere, present active infinitive of serō (to entwine, interlace, link together; to join in a series, string together),[3] ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to bind, tie together; to thread).

Noun[edit]

sere (plural seres)

  1. (ecology) A natural succession of animal or plant communities in an ecosystem, especially a series of communities succeeding one another from the time a habitat is unoccupied to the point when a climax community is achieved. [from early 20th c.]
    Synonym: seral community
    • 1980 August, Douglas C. Andersen; James A. MacMahon; Michael L. Wolfe, “Herbivorous Mammals along a Montane Sere: Community Structure and Energetics”, in Journal of Mammology[1], volume 61, number 3, Baltimore, Md.: American Society of Mammalogists, ISSN 0022-2372, OCLC 1097268763, archived from the original on 21 July 2018, page 501:
      We examined one of several seres found in the middle Rocky Mountains that progress from a subalpine or montane forb-dominated meadow to a climax forest dominated by Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii).
    • 1988 December, Walter F. Mueggler, “Approach”, in Aspen Community Types of the Intermountain Region (General Technical Report; INT-250), Ogden, Ut.: Intermountain Research Station, Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture, OCLC 25967910, page 5, column 1:
      [C]ommunity types may represent either climax plant associations or successional communities within a sere.
    • 2007, Thomas J. Stohlgren, “History and Background, Baggage and Direction”, in Measuring Plant Diversity: Lessons from the Field, Oxford: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, part I (The Past and Present), page 31:
      [S]ome communities persisted as repeating early successional seres ("disclimaxes"), while climax communities could contain small areas of different sere communities.
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French serre (modern French serre (talon)), from serrer (to grip tightly; to shut) (modern French serrer (to squeeze; to tighten)), from Vulgar Latin serrāre (to close, shut), from Late Latin serāre, present active infinitive of serō (to fasten with a bolt; to bar, bolt), from sera (bar for fastening doors), from serō (to bind or join together; entwine, interlace, interweave, plait); see further at etymology 2.[4]

Noun[edit]

sere (plural seres)

  1. (obsolete) A claw, a talon.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English ser, sere, schere, seer, seere, seir, seyr, seyre (different; diverse, various; distinct, individual; parted, separated; many, several),[5] from Old Norse sér (for oneself; separately, dative reflexive pronoun, literally to oneself), from sik (oneself, myself, yourself, herself, himself; ourselves, yourselves, themselves),[6] from Proto-Germanic *sek (oneself), from Proto-Indo-European *swé (self). The English word is cognate with Danish sær (singular), især (especially, particularly), German sich (oneself; herself, himself, itself; themselves), Icelandic sig (oneself; herself, himself, itself; themselves), Latin (herself, himself, itself; themselves), Scots seir, Swedish sär (particularly).[6]

Adjective[edit]

sere (comparative more sere, superlative most sere)

  1. (obsolete or Britain, dialectal) Individual, separate, set apart.
  2. (obsolete or Britain, dialectal) Different; diverse.
    • 1910, James Prior, “Bishoped Porridge”, in Fortuna Chance, London: Constable & Co. Ltd., OCLC 61856236, page 316:
      Thou wert well-nee moidered [footnote: Distracted.] wi' me, I know, but it thou'd telled me, Mary, I mun do better or else we mun goo our sere-ways [footnote: Different ways.], belike I should a done better. I'm nobbut a mon, Mary, a lundy day-tale mon [footnote: Clumsy day-labourer.].
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ sēr(e, adj.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 April 2019.
  2. 2.0 2.1 sere, sear, adj.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1912; “sere1, adj.” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.
  3. ^ sere, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986; “sere2, n.” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.
  4. ^ † sere, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1912.
  5. ^ sẹ̄r(e, adj.(2)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 April 2019.
  6. 6.0 6.1 sere, adv. and adj.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1912.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sere

  1. third-person singular present indicative of srát

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin sēra, from ellipsis of Latin sēra diēs, from sērus (late). Compare Italian sera, Venetian séra, Romansch saira, seira, Romanian seară, French soir.

Noun[edit]

sere f (plural seris)

  1. evening

Derived terms[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French serrer.

Verb[edit]

sere

  1. tighten, squeeze

Adjective[edit]

sere

  1. tight

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈseː.re], /ˈsere/
  • Hyphenation: sé‧re

Noun[edit]

sere f

  1. plural of sera

Anagrams[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sere

  1. old

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Form of the verb serō (I sow or plant).

Verb[edit]

sere

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of serō

Etymology 2[edit]

Form of the verb serō (I join or weave).

Verb[edit]

sere

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of serō

Etymology 3[edit]

Form of sērus.

Adjective[edit]

sēre

  1. vocative masculine singular of sērus

Leonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin esse (to be). The present subjunctive is influenced by Latin sedeō (sit) (present infinitive sedēre).

Verb[edit]

sere

  1. to be

Conjugation[edit]

References[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch sēro. Equivalent to sêer +‎ -e.

Adverb[edit]

sêre

  1. strongly, very, to a great degree
  2. hard, forcefully
  3. fast, with speed

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: zeer
  • Limburgish: zieër

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English sēar, from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz. Doublet of sor (sorrel).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sere

  1. (especially referring to plants) dry, withered, shrunken, brittle
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse sér, dative of sik, from Proto-Germanic *siz, dative and instrumental of *sek, from Proto-Indo-European *swé (self).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (adjective) IPA(key): /seːr/
  • (adverb) IPA(key): /ˈseːr(ə)/

Adjective[edit]

sere

  1. Individual, separate, set apart.
  2. Different; diverse.
  3. Numerous, many, copious.
References[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sere

  1. Separately, severally.
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French seür.

Adjective[edit]

sere

  1. Alternative form of sure

Shona[edit]

Shona cardinal numbers
 <  7 8 9  > 
    Cardinal : sere

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective[edit]

-séré

  1. eight

Inflection[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sere (definite accusative sereyi, plural sereler)

  1. (informal) a measure of distance, being the span, when spreading one’s fingers, from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the index finger.

References[edit]

  • sere in Turkish dictionaries at Türk Dil Kurumu

Zazaki[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Persian سر(sar).

Noun[edit]

sere ?

  1. (anatomy) head