sere

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See also: sére, seré, and Sêre

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English seer, seere, from Old English sēar. More at sear.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sere ‎(comparative serer, superlative serest)

  1. Without moisture.
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, part 5:
      The roaring wind! it roar'd far off,
      It did not come anear;
      But with its sound it shook the sails
      That were so thin and sere.
    • 1868, Henry Lonsdale, The Worthies of Cumberland, volume concerning Sir J. R. G. Graham, chapter 1, page 1:
      …whilst the recitation of Border Minstrelsy, or a well-sung ballad, served to revive the sere and yellow leaf of age by their refreshing memories of the pleasurable past.
    • 1984, Vernor Vinge, The Peace War, chapter 37:
      The grass was sere and golden, the dirt beneath white and gravelly.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

sere ‎(plural seres)

  1. An intermediate stage in an ecosystem prior to advancing to the point of being a climax community.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English sere, ser, from Old Norse sér ‎(for oneself, separately, dative reflexive pronoun, literally to oneself), from Old Norse sik, from Proto-Germanic *sek ‎(oneself). Cognate with Scots seir. Compare Icelandic sig, German sich, Latin se.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sere ‎(comparative more sere, superlative most sere)

  1. (now rare, archaic, dialectal) set apart; separate; individual; different; diverse; several; many
    • 1815, Roger Ascham, The English Works. A New Ed - Page 133:
      Therefore I have seen good shooters which would have for every bow a sere case, made of woollen cloth, and then you may put three or four of them, so cased, into a leather case if you will.
    • 1912, Eliakim Littell, ‎Robert S. Littell, The Living Age - Volume 274 - Page 153:
      Thou wert wellnee moidered' wi' me, I know, but it thou'd telled me, Mary, I mun do better or else we mun goo our sere-ways,' belike I should a done better. I'm nobbut a mon, Mary, a lundy day-tale mon. Thou might a glen me that much [...]
    • 1999, Richard Beadle, ‎Pamela M. King, York Mystery Plays: A Selection in Modern Spelling - Page 104:
      Behold now sir, and thou shalt see Sere kingdoms and sere country; All this will I give to thee For evermore, And thou fall and honour me As I said ere.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

French serre

Noun[edit]

sere ‎(plural seres)

  1. (obsolete) claw; talon
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chapman to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Verb[edit]

sere

  1. 3rd person singular indicative of srát

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sēra, from sērō ‎(at a late hour, late), from sērus ‎(late). Compare Italian sera, Venetian séra, Romansch saira, seira, Romanian seară, French soir.

Noun[edit]

sere f ‎(plural seris)

  1. evening

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈseː.re], /ˈsere/
  • Hyphenation: sé‧re

Noun[edit]

sere f

  1. plural of sera

Anagrams[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sere

  1. old

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Form of the verb serō ‎(I sow or plant).

Verb[edit]

sere

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of serō

Etymology 2[edit]

Form of the verb serō ‎(I join or weave).

Verb[edit]

sere

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of serō

Etymology 3[edit]

Form of sērus.

Adjective[edit]

sēre

  1. vocative masculine singular of sērus

Zazaki[edit]

Noun[edit]

sere ?

  1. (anatomy) head