Minerva

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See also: minerva

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin Minerva, from Etruscan, originally from Proto-Indo-European *men-es-weh₂, extended from the stem *men-s- (mind) (Sanskrit मनस् (manas, mind), compare मनस्विन् (manas-vin-, full of mind or sense)), ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Minerva

  1. (Roman mythology) The goddess of wisdom, especially strategic warfare, and the arts, especially crafts and in particular weaving. She is the Roman counterpart of Athena.
  2. (astronomy) 93 Minerva, a main belt asteroid.
  3. (poetic) wisdom.
Coordinate terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Italian Minerva.

Proper noun[edit]

Minerva (plural Minervas)

  1. A surname, from Italian.

Statistics[edit]

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Minerva is the 33810th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 673 individuals. Minerva is most common among White (83.66%) individuals.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Minerva f

  1. Minerva (Roman goddess)

Further reading[edit]

  • Minerva in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • Minerva in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Etruscan, originally from Proto-Indo-European *menesweh₂, extended from *ménos (mind) (Sanskrit मनस् (manas), compare मनस्विन् (manas-vin-, full of mind or sense)), from the Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Minerva f (genitive Minervae); first declension

  1. Minerva, goddess of wisdom

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative Minerva Minervae
Genitive Minervae Minervārum
Dative Minervae Minervīs
Accusative Minervam Minervās
Ablative Minervā Minervīs
Vocative Minerva Minervae

Descendants[edit]

  • English: Minerva
  • French: Minerve
  • Portuguese: Minerva
  • Spanish: Minerva

References[edit]

  • Minerva in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Minerva in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Minerva in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Minerva, from Etruscan [Term?].

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Minerva f

  1. (Roman mythology) Minerva (goddess of wisdom)

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Minerva, from Etruscan, originally from Proto-Indo-European *men-es-weh₂, extended from the stem *men-s- (mind) (Sanskrit मनस् (manas), compare मनस्विन् (manas-vin-, full of mind or sense)), ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /miˈneɾba/, [miˈneɾ.β̞a]

Proper noun[edit]

Minerva f

  1. (Roman mythology) Minerva

See also[edit]