Diana

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See also: diana, Díana, Diâna, Diāna, Diānā, and Dianą

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Diana (1)

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin Diāna, short form of Latin Dīāna, derived by syncope from Old Latin Dīvāna, equivalent to dīvus +‎ -āna; roughly akin to Proto-Italic *deiwā (goddess) + Proto-Indo-European *-néh₂.

Originally an Old Italic divinity of light and the moon; later identified as the Roman counterpart to Greek goddess Artemis. Cognate of Attic Greek Διώνη (Diṓnē), similarly syncopated from older Ancient Greek Διϝωνη (Diwōnē), whence via Latin Diōne is derived English Dione used in various ways across astronomy, chemistry, biology, and as a given name. From the same root Proto-Indo-European *dyúh₃onh₂- also potentially cognate to English June via Latin Jūnō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana

  1. (Roman mythology) The daughter of Latona and Jupiter, and twin sister of Apollo; the goddess of the hunt, associated wild animals and the forest or wilderness, and an emblem of chastity; the Roman counterpart of Artemis.
  2. (astronomy) 78 Diana, a main belt asteroid.
  3. A female given name from Latin.
    • 1605, William Camden, Remains Concerning Britain, John Russell Smith, published 1870, page 56:
      But succeeding ages (little regarding S. Chrysosthome's admonition to the contrary) have recalled prophane names, so as now Diana, Cassandra, Hyppolytus, Venus, Lais, names of unhappy disaster are as rife, as ever they were in paganism.
    • 1993, James Kirkup, Queens Have Died Young and Fair, P. Owen, →ISBN, page 94:
      A wholesome British name like Diana, Anne, Margaret or Elizabeth impresses a judge much more than all your vulgar Marilyns, Donnas, Madonnas and Dawns.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Hawaiian: Kiana
    • English: Kiana
  • Serbo-Croatian: Дајана, Dajana
  • Spanish: Dayana

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Diana (plural Dianas)

  1. A Diana monkey.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Diana, borrowed from Latin Diāna.

Proper noun[edit]

Diana

  1. a female given name from Latin
  2. (Roman mythology) Diana; the daughter of Latona and Jupiter, and twin sister of Apollo; the goddess of the hunt, associated wild animals and the forest or wilderness, and an emblem of chastity; the Roman counterpart of Artemis
  3. (astronomy) the asteroid 78 Diana

Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana (Roman goddess)
  2. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Diana in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • Diana in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana

Estonian[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana

Faroese[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f

  1. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana

Usage notes[edit]

Matronymics

  • son of Diana: Dianuson
  • daughter of Diana: Dianudóttir

Declension[edit]

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Diana
Accusative Dianu
Dative Dianu
Genitive Dianu

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f (genitive Dianas or Diana)

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Diana.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdja.na/, /diˈa.na/[1]
  • Rhymes: -ana
  • Hyphenation: Dià‧na, Di‧à‧na

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana

Proper noun[edit]

Diana m or f by sense

  1. a surname

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diana in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams[edit]

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

Diana

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ディアナ

Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Original form with long i Dīāna, derived by syncope from Dīvāna, equivalent to dīvus +‎ -āna; some inscriptions read Deiana or Deana, akin to deus +‎ -āna; both feminine stem words dīva and dea meaning “goddess” derived from Old Latin deiva, from Proto-Italic *deiwā from Proto-Indo-European *deywós from *dyew- (heaven, day sky; to shine). See Old Latin Diēspiter, a primitive form of Iuppiter, formed by appending a suffix to Latin diēs, cognate to both dīvus and deus.

Diana is also called Iāna (Jana), analogous to procope of Old Latin Diovis into Iovis (Jove).

The form Dīviāna occurs in Varro's attempt to explain the etymology of the name, with the now-discredited explanation that "quod luna in altitudinem et latitudinem simul <i>t, Diviana, appellata"; the intention seems to be to derive the name from dēviō (stray, deviate), from via (road).[1] If Dīviāna was a genuinely used variant form (rather than a hypothetical form proposed as a precursor), it appears to represent a univerbation dīva +‎ Iāna, literally Goddess Jana.[2]

Compare Attic Greek Διώνη (Diṓnē), Doric Greek Διώνᾱ (Diṓnā), syncopated from Ancient Greek Διϝωνᾱ (Diwōnā), from a shared root whence by analogical formation also evolved Latin Iūnō, Iūnōnis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Dīāna or Diāna f (genitive Dīānae or Diānae); first declension

  1. (religion) Diana, the daughter of Latona and Jupiter, and twin sister of Apollo; the goddess of the hunt, associated with wild animals and the forest or wilderness, and an emblem of chastity; the Roman counterpart of Greek goddess Artemis.

Declension[edit]

Old Latin long i form Dīāna, first-declension noun

Case Singular Plural
Nominative Dīāna Dīānae
Genitive Dīānae Dīānārum
Dative Dīānae Dīānīs
Accusative Dīānam Dīānās
Ablative Dīānā Dīānīs
Vocative Dīāna Dīānae

Late Latin short i form Diāna, first-declension noun

Case Singular Plural
Nominative Diāna Diānae
Genitive Diānae Diānārum
Dative Diānae Diānīs
Accusative Diānam Diānās
Ablative Diānā Diānīs
Vocative Diāna Diānae

Descendants[edit]

  • Eastern Romance
  • Old French: gene (mischievous fairy)
  • Sardinian: giàna
  • West Iberian
    • Asturian: xana
    • Galician: xa (mischievous fairy)
  • ? Albanian: zanë
  • Neapolitan: janara (witch)

As a female given name:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roland G. Kent (1938), T.E. Page, E. Capps, W. H. D. Rouse, editors, Varro On The Latin Language[1], volume I, London: William Heinemann Ltd., →ISBN, pages 64-65
  2. ^ Edward Greswell (1854) Origines Kalendariæ Italicæ, Nundinal Calendars of Ancient Italy, Nundinal Calendar of Romulus, Calendar of Numa Pompilius, Calendar of the Decemvirs, Irregular Roman Calendar, and Julian Correction. Tables of the Roman Calendar, from U.C. 4 of Varro B.C. 750 to U.C. 1108 A.D. 355.[2], volume I, Oxford: Oxford University Press, →OCLC, page 362

Further reading[edit]

  • Diana”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Diana”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Diana in Georges, Karl Ernst; Georges, Heinrich (1913–1918) Ausführliches lateinisch-deutsches Handwörterbuch, volume 1, 8th edition, Hahnsche Buchhandlung
  • Diana in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Lithuanian[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f

  1. a female given name

Middle English[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana

  1. Alternative form of Diane

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin Diāna, from Latin Dīāna, from Old Latin Dīvāna.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdja.na/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ana
  • Syllabification: Dia‧na

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f

  1. a female given name from Latin, equivalent to English Diana

Declension[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana (Roman goddess)
  2. 78 Diana (main belt asteroid)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Diana in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin Diāna. Doublet of Daiane and Daiana.

Pronunciation[edit]

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /d͡ʒiˈɐ̃.nɐ/ [d͡ʒɪˈɐ̃.nɐ], (faster pronunciation) /ˈd͡ʒjɐ̃.nɐ/
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /d͡ʒiˈɐ.na/ [d͡ʒɪˈɐ.na], (faster pronunciation) /ˈd͡ʒjɐ.na/
 

  • Hyphenation: Di‧a‧na

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f (plural Dianas)

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana (Roman goddess)
  2. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana

See also[edit]

Slovak[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f (genitive singular Diany, nominative plural Diany, declension pattern of žena)

  1. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana
  2. (Roman mythology) Diana

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Diana”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Diāna.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdjana/ [ˈd̪ja.na]
  • Rhymes: -ana
  • Syllabification: Dia‧na

Proper noun[edit]

Diana f

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. a female given name from Latin, equivalent to English Diana

Related terms[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Diana c (genitive Dianas)

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. a female given name, equivalent to English Diana