Cynthia

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Cynthia, from Ancient Greek Κυνθία (Kunthía, Artemis), born on Mount Κύνθος.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: sĭnʹthē-ə, IPA(key): /ˈsɪnθiə/[1]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Cyn‧thi‧a[1]
  • Rhymes: -ɪnθiə

Proper noun[edit]

Cynthia (plural Cynthias)

  1. Artemis (Greek goddess).[1]
  2. (literary) The Moon.[1]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book 3, Canto 1:
      As when faire Cynthia, in darkesome night, / Is in a noyous cloud enveloped [...].
    • 1601, Ben Jonson, Hymn to Diana:
      [...] Cynthia's shining orb was made / Heav'n to clear when day did close [...].
  3. A female given name from Ancient Greek.[1]
    • 1866, Elizabeth Gaskell, Wives and Daughters, Chapter 10:
      Cynthia seems to me such an out-of-the-way name, only fit for poetry, not for daily use.”
    • 1978, Graham Greene, The Human Factor, →ISBN, p. 59:
      Cynthia, the domestic-minded, looked as dashing as a young commando. It was a pity that her spelling was so bad, but perhaps there was something Elizabethan about her spelling as well as about her name.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Popular given name in the US in the 1950s and the 1960s.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Cynthia” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Cynthia.

Proper noun[edit]

Cynthia

  1. a female given name from Ancient Greek

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:Cynthia.


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Morphologically Cynthus (Cynthus) +‎ -ia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Cynthia f (genitive Cynthiae); first declension

  1. Artemis (Greek goddess) identified with Diana (Roman goddess).[1]
  2. (poetic)[2] the moon.[3]
  3. a female given name.[4]
  4. Delos.[4]

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative Cynthia Cynthiae
Genitive Cynthiae Cynthiārum
Dative Cynthiae Cynthiīs
Accusative Cynthiam Cynthiās
Ablative Cynthiā Cynthiīs
Vocative Cynthia Cynthiae

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Cynthia

  1. nominative feminine singular of Cynthius.
  2. nominative neuter plural of Cynthius.
  3. accusative neuter plural of Cynthius.
  4. vocative feminine singular of Cynthius.
  5. vocative neuter plural of Cynthius.

Adjective[edit]

Cynthiā

  1. ablative feminine singular of Cynthius.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sullivan, J. P., Propertius: a Critical Introduction, p. 79.
  2. ^ Morton Braund, S. (2009), A Lucan Reader: Selections from Civil War, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Inc., p. 52.
  3. ^ Mélanges offerts à Jacques Heurgon : l'Italie préromaine et la Rome républicaine (1976), volume I, p. 19; Morton Braund, S. (2009), A Lucan Reader: Selections from Civil War, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Inc., p. 52.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Cynthia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette.

Portuguese[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Cynthia f

  1. alternative spelling of Cíntia.

Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Cynthia.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: cyn‧thia

Proper noun[edit]

Cynthia

  1. A female given name from English.