fou

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See also: Fou, fóu, fǒu, and -fou

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Scots fou. Compare full, a doublet.

Adjective[edit]

fou (comparative more fou, superlative most fou)

  1. (Scotland) Drunk.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:drunk
    • 2022, Liam McIlvanney, The Heretic, page 110:
      Shand's father had missed the whole thing — getting fou in the pub, more than likely—but his mum had been there, in her best green twinset, her court shoes polished to a shine as high as Shand's.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Latin fōcem, early monophthongized variant of faucem.

Noun[edit]

fou m (plural fous)

  1. (archaic) a narrow cove
  2. a narrow passage, a ravine
    Synonym: barranc

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

fou

  1. third-person singular preterite indicative of ser
  2. third-person singular preterite indicative of ésser

References[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Middle French fol, from Old French fol, from Latin follem. Cognate with English fool.

Adjective[edit]

fou (masculine singular before vowel fol, feminine folle, masculine plural fous, feminine plural folles)

  1. mad, crazy
    Synonyms: folle, dingue, loufoque, cinglé, farfelu, détraqué, maboul, louf, ouf, cinglé, cintré, taré, dingo
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Louisiana Creole: fou

Noun[edit]

fou m (plural fous, feminine folle)

  1. madman
  2. jester (court entertainer)
  3. (colloquial) nut (extreme enthusiast)
    Synonym: malade
    C’est un fou de voile.He's a sailing nut.
Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Mauritian Creole: fol

Etymology 2[edit]

From Spanish alfil, from Arabicاَلْفِيل(al-fīl, elephant; bishop (chess piece)), influenced by Etymology 1.

Noun[edit]

fou m (plural fous)

  1. (chess) bishop
  2. booby (bird)

See also[edit]

Chess pieces in French · pièces d’échecs (layout · text)
♚ ♛ ♜ ♝ ♞ ♟
roi dame tour fou cavalier pion

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Louisiana Creole[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from French fou (mad, crazy).

Adjective[edit]

fou m (feminine fòl)

  1. crazy, mad

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from French four (oven, stove).

Noun[edit]

fou

  1. (an) oven

Luxembourgish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fou

  1. second-person singular imperative of fouen

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fou

  1. Nonstandard spelling of fóu.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of fǒu.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of fòu.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French fou.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fou (feminine fol)

  1. (masculine) mad, crazy person

Adjective[edit]

fou (feminine fol)

  1. (masculine) mad, crazy, insane
    Synonym: pagla

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old English fāh, from Proto-West Germanic *faih, from Proto-Germanic *faihaz.

Forms without final /x/ are a result of levelling from Old English inflected forms (e.g. masculine weak nominative singular fāga).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fou

  1. multicoloured, stippled

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

fou (plural fous)

  1. A kind of multicoloured fur.

References[edit]

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French forn, from Latin furnus.

Noun[edit]

fou m (plural fous)

  1. (Jersey) oven

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fagus.

Noun[edit]

fou oblique singularm (oblique plural fous, nominative singular fous, nominative plural fou)

  1. beech (tree)

Descendants[edit]

Old Irish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

fou

  1. Alternative spelling of fóu

Romanian[edit]

Interjection[edit]

fou

  1. Obsolete form of .

References[edit]

  • fou in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

Samoan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(ma-)baqəʀu, from Proto-Austronesian *(ma-)baqəʀuh.

Adjective[edit]

fou

  1. new (recently made or created)

Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English full, from Proto-West Germanic *full, from Proto-Germanic *fullaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁nós.

Adjective[edit]

fou (comparative mair fou, superlative maist fou)

  1. full
  2. well-fed, full of food or drink, sated, replete
  3. drunk, intoxicated

Adverb[edit]

fou (comparative mair fou, superlative maist fou)

  1. fully, very, quite, rather, too

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

fou

  1. saxifrage

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

fou (plural fous)

  1. bushel

Tsou[edit]

Noun[edit]

fou

  1. animal meat

West Makian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Possibly cognate to Ternate horu (to paddle).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fou

  1. (intransitive) to paddle
Conjugation[edit]
Conjugation of fou (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tofou mofou afou
2nd person nofou fofou
3rd person inanimate ifou dofou
animate
imperative nofou, fou fofou, fou

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fou

  1. betel leaf

References[edit]

  • James Collins (1982) Further Notes Towards a West Makian Vocabulary[1], Pacific linguistics