forn

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See also: fórn

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English foran (before, in front, forward, to the front). More at fore.

Adverb[edit]

forn (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Fore, before; forward; previously.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin furnus.

Noun[edit]

forn m (plural forns)

  1. oven

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

forn (comparative fornari, superlative fornastur)

  1. old, ancient

Declension[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Proto-Germanic *fur-

Adverb[edit]

fōrn

  1. before, in front of, opposit, across from
    Gesæt Benedictus fórn ongeán ðam — Sat Benedict opposit to them
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *furhnō (trout).

Noun[edit]

forn f

  1. trout

Usage notes[edit]

  • The precise gender of the word is unknown. It is generally regarded as a feminine a-stem due to cognates in related Germanic languages.

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fernaz (foregoing, previous; recent), from Proto-Indo-European *perǝm-, *perǝ- (fore, first), from Proto-Indo-European *per- (forth, over, across, through). Cognate with Old English firn, fyrn-, Old Frisian fīr, fēr, Old Saxon fern, Old High German firni, Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌽𐌴𐌹𐍃 (fairneis).

Adjective[edit]

forn (comparative fornari, superlative fornastr)

  1. old, ancient

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse forn, from Proto-Germanic *fernaz (foregoing, previous; recent), from Proto-Indo-European *perǝm-, *perǝ- (fore, first), from Proto-Indo-European *per- (forth, over, across, through)

Adjective[edit]

forn

  1. ancient, very old

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]