comparative

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French comparatif, from Latin comparativus, equivalent to comparatus, from comparare (to compare) + -ive, from Latin -ivus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

comparative (comparative more comparative, superlative most comparative)

  1. Of or relating to comparison.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
    • '1773, James Burnett, Of the Origin and Progress of Language
      that kind of animals that have the comparative faculty, by which they compare things together, deliberate and resolve
  2. Using comparison as a method of study, or founded on something using it.
    comparative anatomy
  3. Approximated by comparison; relative.
    • 2016 October 24, Owen Gibson, “Is the unthinkable happening – are people finally switching the football off?”, in The Guardian[1], London:
      The Olympics, the weather and a comparative lack of heavyweight clashes so far this season have been cited as reasons for the drop in viewers.
    • 1837, William Whewell, History of the Inductive Sciences
      The recurrence of comparative warmth and cold.
    • 1692, Richard Bentley, A Confutation of Atheism
      This bubble, [] by reason of its comparative levity to the fluid that encloses it, would necessarily ascend to the top.
  4. (obsolete) Comparable; bearing comparison.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, II.137:
      And need he had of slumber yet, for none / Had suffered more—his hardships were comparative / To those related in my grand-dad's Narrative.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

comparative (plural comparatives)

  1. (grammar) A construction showing a relative quality, in English usually formed by adding more or appending -er. For example, the comparative of green is greener; of evil, more evil.
  2. (grammar) A word in the comparative form.
  3. (chiefly in the plural) Data used to make a comparison.
    • 2010, Barry Smith, Introductory Financial Accounting and Reporting, page 171:
      Investment ratios are positive. Comparative or trend data are required to draw final conclusions. The absence of comparatives and trend data constrains the conclusions.
  4. (obsolete) An equal; a rival; a compeer.
  5. (obsolete) One who makes comparisons; one who affects wit.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

comparative

  1. feminine singular of comparatif

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

comparative

  1. feminine plural of comparativo

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

comparātīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of comparātīvus

References[edit]