faux

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French faux.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faux ‎(not comparable)

  1. Fake or artificial
    • 2008, James Chandler, ‎Maureen N. McLane, The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry
      He modernizes the faux-archaic “withouten wind, withouten tide” to the more pointed and concrete “without a breeze, without a tide.”
    • 2012, Susan Crabtree, ‎Peter Beudert, Scenic Art for the Theatre: History, Tools and Techniques (page 392)
      Because mahoganies yield a supple fine-grained wood, they are often used as veneer wood. With proper technique and graining tools, all ofthese variations can be produced in faux wood.
    • 2012, Annie Padden Jubb, ‎David Jubb, LifeFood Recipe Book: Living on Life Force (page 196)
      Run grapes, either frozen, chilled, or room temperature, through your juicer for an incredible grape faux wine.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French fauz, faus from Latin falsus

Adjective[edit]

faux m ‎(feminine singular fausse, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fausses)

  1. false; untrue
  2. false; not real
Antonyms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

faux

  1. badly; inaccurately; untruly

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin falx.

Noun[edit]

faux f ‎(plural faux)

  1. scythe

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French fail, faus, from Latin fallō, fallis.

Verb[edit]

faux

  1. first-person singular present indicative of faillir
  2. second-person singular present indicative of faillir

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown. Possibly related to Ancient Greek χάος(kháos, abyss, chasm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

faux f ‎(genitive faucis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) throat, gullet
  2. chasm

Inflection[edit]

Third declension, alternative accusative singular in -im, alternative ablative singular in and accusative plural in -īs.

Case Singular Plural
nominative faux faucēs
genitive faucis faucium
dative faucī faucibus
accusative faucem
faucim
faucēs
faucīs
ablative fauce
faucī
faucibus
vocative faux faucēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


References[edit]

Middle French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faux m ‎(feminine singular fauce, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fauces)

  1. Alternative form of faulx

Norman[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French faulz, the plural of fault, ultimately from Latin falsus.

Adjective[edit]

faux m

  1. (Jersey) false
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin falx, from Proto-Indo-European *dhalk-, *dhalg-(a cutting tool).

Noun[edit]

faux f ‎(plural faux)

  1. (Jersey) scythe