faux

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Faux

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from French faux. Doublet of false.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faux (not comparable)

  1. Fake or artificial.
    Synonyms: cod, mock
    Antonym: genuine
    • 2008, James Chandler, Maureen N. McLane, The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry:
      He modernizes the faux-archaic “withouten wind, withouten tide” to the more pointed and concrete “without a breeze, without a tide.”
    • 2012, Susan Crabtree, Peter Beudert, Scenic Art for the Theatre: History, Tools and Techniques, page 392:
      Because mahoganies yield a supple fine-grained wood, they are often used as veneer wood. With proper technique and graining tools, all of these variations can be produced in faux wood.
    • 2012, Annie Padden Jubb, David Jubb, LifeFood Recipe Book: Living on Life Force, page 196:
      Run grapes, either frozen, chilled, or room temperature, through your juicer for an incredible grape faux wine.
    • 2021 February 7, Daniel Kreps, “Watch ‘Saturday Night Live’ Skewer Super Bowl Sunday”, in Rolling Stone[1]:
      The pregame crew then showed a pair of faux-Super Bowl ads, including an unnecessarily woke Cheez-It commercial and a Papa John’s ad that fully embraces Pizzagaters.
    • 2022 November 21, Julie Creswell, “Beyond Meat Is Struggling, and the Plant-Based Meat Industry Worries”, in The New York Times[2]:
      Its faux burgers and sausages were landing on dinner plates in homes throughout the United States and on the menu boards of chans like Subway, Carl’s Jr. and Starbucks.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fo/, (in liaison) /fo.z‿/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -o

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Middle French faulx, from Old French fauz, faus, fals, from Latin falsus.

Adjective[edit]

faux (feminine fausse, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fausses)

  1. false; untrue
  2. false; not real
    Antonyms: vrai, réel, authentique
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: faux

Adverb[edit]

faux

  1. badly; inaccurately; untruly

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from Middle French faulx, from Old French fauz, from Latin falcem, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰelk-, *dʰelg- (a cutting tool).

Noun[edit]

une faux

faux f (plural faux)

  1. scythe
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Inherited from Old French fail, faus, from Latin fallō, fallis.

Verb[edit]

faux

  1. first/second-person singular present indicative of faillir

Further reading[edit]

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown. Possibly related to Ancient Greek χᾰ́ος (kháos, abyss, chasm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

faux f (genitive faucis); third declension (rare)

  1. singular of faucēs (throat, gorge)
This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Usage notes[edit]

The word is rarely used in the singular, and only in the ablative (in poems) and nominative (only attested once).

Inflection[edit]

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative faux faucēs
Genitive faucis faucium
Dative faucī faucibus
Accusative faucem faucēs
faucīs
Ablative fauce faucibus
Vocative faux faucēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

(See also fōx.)

References[edit]

  • faux”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • faux”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • faux in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 207

Middle French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faux m (feminine singular fauce, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fauces)

  1. Alternative form of faulx

Norman[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French faulz, the plural of fault, ultimately from Latin falsus.

Adjective[edit]

faux m

  1. (Jersey) false
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin falx, from Proto-Indo-European *dhalk-, *dhalg- (a cutting tool).

Noun[edit]

faux f (plural faux)

  1. (Jersey) scythe