falx

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin falx (sickle).

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /fælks/, /fɔlks/

Noun[edit]

falx (plural falxes or falces)

  1. a short Dacian sword that resembles a sickle
  2. (anatomy) A curved fold or process of the dura mater or the peritoneum, especially one of the partition-like folds of the dura mater which extend into the great fissures of the brain.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dʰelk-, *dʰelg- (a cutting tool). Cognate with Old Irish delg (thorn, needle), Old English dalc (a pin, brooch, bracelet). More at dalk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

falx f (genitive falcis); third declension

  1. sickle, scythe
  2. (military) a hook used to pull down walls

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative falx falcēs
genitive falcis falcum
dative falcī falcibus
accusative falcem falcēs
ablative falce falcibus
vocative falx falcēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • falx in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • falx in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “falx”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • falx” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • falx in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • falx in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Lewis & Short, A Latin Dictionary