fang

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See also: Fang, fāng, fáng, fǎng, and fàng

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fangen, from Old English fōn (to take, grasp, seize, catch, capture, make prisoner, receive, accept, assume, undertake, meet with, encounter), and Old Norse fanga (to fetch, capture), both from Proto-Germanic *fanhaną, *fangōną (to catch, capture), from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ḱ- (to fasten, place). Cognate with West Frisian fange (to catch), Dutch vangen (to catch), German fangen (to catch), Danish fange (to catch), Albanian peng (to hinder, hold captive).

Verb[edit]

fang (third-person singular simple present fangs, present participle fanging, simple past and past participle fanged)

  1. (transitive, dialectal or archaic) To catch, capture; seize; grip; clutch; lay hold of.
    • J. Webster
      He's in the law's clutches; you see he's fanged.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  2. (transitive, dialectal or obsolete) To take; receive with assent; accept.
  3. (transitive, obsolete, as a guest) To receive with hospitality; welcome.
  4. (transitive, obsolete, a thing given or imposed) To receive.
  5. (transitive, dialectal) To receive or adopt into spiritual relation, as in baptism; be godfather or godmother to.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English fang, feng (a catching, capture, seizing), from Old English fang, feng (grip, embrace, grasp, grasping, capture, prey, booty, plunder), from Proto-Germanic *fangą, *fangiz, *fanhiz (catch, catching, seizure), from *fanhaną (to catch, capture), from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ǵ- (to fasten). Cognate with Scots fang (that which is taken, capture, catch, prey, booty), Dutch vang (a catch), Low German fangst (a catch), German Fang (a catch, capture, booty), Swedish fång, fångst, Icelandic fang. Related also to Latin pangere (to solidify, drive in), Albanian mpij (to benumb, stiffen), Ancient Greek πήγνυμι (pḗgnumi, to stiffen, firm up), Sanskrit पाशयति (pāśáyati, (s)he binds).

Noun[edit]

fang (plural fangs)

  1. (Now chiefly dialetal, Scotland) A grasping; capture; the act or power of seizing; hold.
  2. That which is seized or carried off; booty; spoils; stolen goods.
  3. Any projection, catch, shoot, or other thing by which hold is taken; a prehensile part or organ.
  4. (mining) A channel cut in the rock, or a pipe of wood, used for conveying air.
  5. (rare, in the plural) Cage-shuts.
  6. (dialectal) The coil or bend of a rope; (by extension) a noose; a trap.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From an abbreviation of fangtooth, from Middle English *fangtooth, *fengtooth, from Old English fængtōþ, fengtōþ (canine tooth, literally catch-tooth). Cognate with German Fangzahn (fang, literally catch-tooth) and Dutch vangtand.

Noun[edit]

fang (plural fangs)

  1. a long, pointed canine tooth used for biting and tearing flesh
  2. (in snakes) a long pointed tooth for injecting venom
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fang (third-person singular simple present fangs, present participle fanging, simple past and past participle fanged)

  1. (rare) To strike or attack with the fangs.
  2. To enable to catch or tear; to furnish with fangs.
    • Philips
      chariots fanged with scythes

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

fang m (plural fangs)

  1. mud

See also[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fang

  1. Imperative of fange.
  1. Catch.
  2. Capture.
Fang mig!
Catch me!

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

fang

  1. Imperative singular of fangen.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of fāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of fáng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of fǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of fàng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fangą, *fangiz, *fanhiz (catch, catching, seizure), from *fanhaną (to catch, capture).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fang m

  1. plunder, booty

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

fang f (genitive fainge, plural fangan)

  1. vulture