fang

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See also: FANG, Fang, fáng, fàng, fâng, fāng, and fǎng

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: făng, IPA(key): /fæŋ/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋ

Etymology 1[edit]

From an abbreviation of fangtooth, from Middle English *fangtooth, *fengtooth, from Old English fengtōþ (canine tooth, literally snag-tooth, catch-tooth). Cognate with German Fangzahn (fang, literally catch-tooth) and Dutch vangtand.

Noun[edit]

Cat fangs
Snake fangs

fang (plural fangs)

  1. a long, pointed canine tooth used for biting and tearing flesh
  2. (in snakes) a long pointed tooth for injecting venom
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fang (third-person singular simple present fangs, present participle fanging, simple past and past participle fanged)

  1. (rare) To strike or attack with the fangs.
  2. To enable to catch or tear; to furnish with fangs.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English fangen, from Old English fōn (to take, grasp, seize, catch, capture, make prisoner, receive, accept, assume, undertake, meet with, encounter), and Old Norse fanga (to fetch, capture), both from Proto-Germanic *fanhaną, *fangōną (to catch, capture), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ḱ- (to attach). Cognate with West Frisian fange (to catch), Dutch vangen (to catch), German fangen (to catch), Danish fange (to catch), Albanian peng (to hinder, hold captive), Sanskrit पाशयति (pāśáyati, (s)he binds).

Verb[edit]

fang (third-person singular simple present fangs, present participle fanging, simple past and past participle fanged)

  1. (transitive, dialectal or archaic) To catch, capture; seize.
    Synonyms: clasp, grasp, grip, clutch, lay hold of; see also Thesaurus:grasp
  2. (transitive, dialectal or obsolete) To take; receive with assent; accept.
    Synonyms: land, lay hands on, score; see also Thesaurus:receive, Thesaurus:take
  3. (transitive, obsolete, as a guest) To receive with hospitality.
    Synonyms: greet, welcome
  4. (transitive, obsolete, a thing given or imposed) To receive.
    Synonyms: cop, get; see also Thesaurus:receive
  5. (transitive, dialectal) To receive or adopt into spiritual relation, as in baptism; be godfather or godmother to.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English fang, possibly from Old English fang, feng (grasp, catch), from Proto-Germanic *fangą (catch, catching, seizure), from *fanhaną (to catch, capture), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ḱ- (to attach); alternatively borrowed from Old Norse fang (catch) or formed anew from the verb fangen. Compare Scots fang (catch), Dutch vang (a catch), Low German fangst (a catch), German Fang (a catch, capture, booty), Swedish fång, fångst, Icelandic fang. Related also to Latin pangere (to solidify, drive in), Albanian mpij (to benumb, stiffen), Ancient Greek πήγνυμι (pḗgnumi, to stiffen, firm up), Sanskrit पाशयति (pāśáyati, (s)he binds).

Noun[edit]

fang (plural fangs)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal, Scotland) A grasping; capture; the act or power of seizing; hold.
  2. That which is seized or carried off; booty; spoils; stolen goods.
  3. Any projection, catch, shoot, or other thing by which hold is taken; a prehensile part or organ.
  4. (mining) A channel cut in the rock, or a pipe of wood, used for conveying air.
  5. (mining, rare, in the plural) Catches on which the coal mining cage rests while cars are being moved on and off.
    Synonym: cage-shuts
  6. (nautical) The coil or bend of a rope; (by extension) a noose; a trap.
  7. (nautical) The valve of a pump box.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fang (third-person singular simple present fangs, present participle fanging, simple past and past participle fanged)

  1. (Scotland, transitive) To supply (a pump) with the water necessary for it to operate.

Etymology 4[edit]

The Macquarie Dictionary and the Australian National Dictionary Centre derive it from the name of Juan Fangio, Argentinian racing driver.[1]

Verb[edit]

fang (third-person singular simple present fangs, present participle fanging, simple past and past participle fanged)

  1. (Australia, slang, transitive, intransitive) To drive, ride, etc. at high speed or recklessly.
    • 2008, Mardi McConnochie, “The Mission”, in Dangerous Games:
      Soph was probably out drag-racing with Draz, or fanging down some brightly lit street somewhere hanging out Draz's brother's sunroof and waving at passers-by and screaming.
    • 2014 August 1, Michael West, “Victoria's $1 billion per kilometre road - who wouldn't rail against that?”, in The Age[2]:
      The question of whether rail might be a better long-term option than road is passed over with the speed of a merchant banker fanging up the toll road to Mount Buller for the weekend []
    • 2017, Karen M. Davis, Fatal Mistake:
      Batman changed gears and fanged the car a little too fast around a corner, almost skidding onto Elizabeth Street at the back of Redfern.
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Mailbag”, in Ozwords[1], Australian National Dictionary Centre, October 2016

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Germanic origin, from Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌽𐌲𐌰 (fanga, mud, addle, mire), from Proto-Germanic *fangō (wetness, moisture), from Proto-Indo-European *penk- (mud, rot, filth).

Cognate with French fange (mud, mire) (from Germanic), German feucht (moist, damp), Dutch vocht (moisture, humidity), Old English fūht (moist, damp), Swedish fukt (moisture, humidity).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fang m (plural fangs)

  1. mud

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Spanish: fango

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fang

  1. imperative of fange
    1. Catch.
    2. Capture.
      Fang mig!Catch me!

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fang

  1. singular imperative of fangen

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fang (catch; embrace, hold), from Proto-Germanic *fangą (catch), from Proto-Germanic *fanhaną (to take, to seize; to catch, to capture).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fang n (genitive singular fangs, nominative plural föng)

  1. embrace, hold, grasp
    Synonym: faðmur
  2. (in the plural) provisions
    Synonym: vistir

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • (to get, to receive)
  • fengur (catch; benefit, gain)

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of fāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of fáng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of fǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of fàng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

fang n (definite singular fanget, indefinite plural fang, definite plural fanga or fangene)

  1. lap

Verb[edit]

fang

  1. imperative of fange

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse fang.

Noun[edit]

fang n (definite singular fanget, indefinite plural fang, definite plural fanga)

  1. lap

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

fang

  1. imperative of fanga

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fangą, *fangiz, *fanhiz (catch, catching, seizure), from *fanhaną (to catch, capture).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fang m

  1. plunder, booty

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish fang (compare Welsh gwanc (voracity)).

Noun[edit]

fang f (genitive singular fainge, plural fangan)

  1. vulture
  2. raven

References[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “fang”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “fang”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Etymology 2[edit]

From Scots fank.

Noun[edit]

fang

  1. fank, sheep pen

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fang m (uncountable)

  1. Fang

Further reading[edit]