fissure

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: fissuré

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English fissure, from Old French fissure, from Latin fissūra (a cleft, chink), from findō (to cleave, split, divide) +‎ -tūra (nominal suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fissure (plural fissures)

  1. A long, narrow crack or opening made by breaking or splitting, especially in rock or earth.
    Hyponym: microfissure
    • 1960 April, J. P. Wilson; E. N. C. Haywood, “The route through the Peak—Derby to Manchester: Part Two”, in Trains Illustrated, page 224:
      After Miller's Dale Junction, the main Derby-Manchester line crosses the Wye for the last time and turns north-west up Great Rocks Dale, a natural fissure several miles long.
  2. (anatomy) A groove, deep furrow, elongated cleft or tear between body parts or in the substance of an organ; a sulcus.
    Hyponyms: anal fissure, anterior median fissure, longitudinal fissure, orbital fissure, palpebral fissure, Rolandic fissure, sylvian fissure
  3. (anatomy) A break or slit in tissue usually at the junction of skin and mucous membrane.
  4. A state of incompatibility or disagreement.
    Synonym: schism

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fissure (third-person singular simple present fissures, present participle fissuring, simple past and past participle fissured)

  1. To split, forming fissures.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, borrowed from Latin fissura.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fissure f (plural fissures)

  1. fissure
    Synonym: fente

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

fissure

  1. inflection of fissurer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

fissūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of fissūrus

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French fissure, from Latin fissūra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fissure (Late Middle English, rare)

  1. (anatomy) fissure, rupture
  2. (surgery) incision

Descendants[edit]

  • English: fissure

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

fissure

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fissurar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fissurar
  3. first-person singular imperative of fissurar
  4. third-person singular imperative of fissurar