follis

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin follis (a bag).

Noun[edit]

follis

  1. A large bronze coin minted during the Roman Empire.

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

follis

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive form of follar

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰolǵʰnis, o-grade i-stem derivative of *bʰelǵʰ- (to swell). Cognates include बर्हिस् (barhís, straw, sacrificial straw), Old English belġ (bulge, bag, purse) (English belly) and belġan (to swell with anger), Old Prussian balsinis (cushion) and Old Irish bolg (belly; bag; bellows).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

follis m (genitive follis); third declension

  1. bellows
  2. purse, sack, money bag
  3. (by extension) a small value coin
  4. an inflated ball
  5. paunch, belly
  6. (poetic) puffed cheeks

Inflection[edit]

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative follis follēs
genitive follis follium
dative follī follibus
accusative follem follēs
ablative folle follibus
vocative follis follēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • follis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • follis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “follis”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • follis” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • follis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • follis in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin