follis

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin follis (a bag). Doublet of fool.

Noun[edit]

follis

  1. A large bronze coin minted during the Roman Empire.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

follis

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive form of follar

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰolǵʰ-n-is, o-grade i-stem derivative of *bʰelǵʰ- (to swell) with an *-n- suffix. Cognates include Sanskrit बर्हिस् (barhís, straw, sacrificial straw), Old English belġ (bulge, bag, purse) (English belly) and belġan (to swell with anger), Old Prussian balsinis (cushion) and Old Irish bolg (belly; bag; bellows).

Or simply from Proto-Indo-European *bʰol-n-is, ultimately from the same root, i.e. *bʰel- (to blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

follis m (genitive follis); third declension

  1. bellows
  2. purse, sack, money bag
  3. (by extension) a small value coin
  4. an inflated ball
  5. paunch, belly
  6. (poetic) puffed cheeks

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative follis follēs
Genitive follis follium
Dative follī follibus
Accusative follem follēs
follīs
Ablative folle follibus
Vocative follis follēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • follis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • follis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • follis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • follis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • follis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • follis in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin