fest

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See also: Fest, fêst, and -fest

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Fest.

Related to Middle English feste, from Old French feste, from Latin festum (see festivity); however, the modern word is a borrowing of the German, which shares the same ultimate origin. More at feast.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fest ‎(plural fests)

  1. (in combination) A gathering for a specified reason or occasion.
    a Renaissance fest

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Fest, from Latin fēstum(holiday, festival, banquet, feast).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɛst/, [fɛsd̥]

Noun[edit]

fest c (singular definite festen, plural indefinite fester)

  1. party
  2. celebration
  3. festival
  4. feast
  5. fête

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German festi, from Proto-Germanic *fastuz; see there for cognates and further etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fest ‎(comparative fester, superlative am festesten)

  1. firm; compact; hard
  2. firm; fixed; rigid
  3. firm; steadfast

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

  • Fest – n. festival
  • feste – adv. hard, firmly

External links[edit]

  • fest in Duden online

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *pëčɜ-(color; to color)[1] +‎ -t(causative suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fest

  1. to paint
  2. to dye
  3. (intransitive) to look somehow
    Hogy fest?‎ ― What does it look like?
    • 1989, John Updike (author), Árpád Göncz (translator), Így látja Roger [Roger's Version], Budapest: Európa Könyvkiadó, ISBN 9630749483, page 203:
      Dale nem festett valami jól; viaszos sápadtsága szinte beteges volt. S mintha izzadt volna; ingzubbonya fölé kockás sportzakót vett, s e kettő nagyon nem illett össze.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Álgu etymological database, entry #78153 (language: Hungarian, word: fëst-)

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adjective[edit]

fest ‎(masculine festen, neuter fest, comparative méi fest, superlative am feststen)

  1. firm, hard
  2. solid
  3. rigid
  4. fixed, fast

Declension[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

fest

  1. to feast

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin festum

Noun[edit]

fest m ‎(definite singular festen, indefinite plural fester, definite plural festene)

  1. celebration, party
  2. (religion) feast, festival
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

fest

  1. imperative of feste

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin festum

Noun[edit]

fest m ‎(definite singular festen, indefinite plural festar, definite plural festane)

  1. celebration, party
  2. (religion) feast, festival

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German fest.

Adverb[edit]

fest

  1. (Silesian dialects) firmly, strongly

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German fest

Adverb[edit]

fest ‎(Cyrillic spelling фест)

  1. (Kajkavian) very
  2. (Kajkavian) intensively
  3. (Kajkavian) tightly, strongly, firmly

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fest c

  1. party, celebration

Declension[edit]

Inflection of fest 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fest festen fester festerna
Genitive fests festens festers festernas

Derived terms[edit]


Yola[edit]

Noun[edit]

fest

  1. fist

References[edit]

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)