fest

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See also: Fest, fêst, and -fest

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Fest.

Related to Middle English feste, from Old French feste, from Latin festum (see festivity); however, the modern word is a borrowing of the German, which shares the same ultimate origin. More at feast.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fest (plural fests)

  1. (in combination) A gathering for a specified reason or occasion.
    a Renaissance fest

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Fest, from Latin fēstum (holiday, festival, banquet, feast).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɛst/, [fɛsd̥]

Noun[edit]

fest c (singular definite festen, plural indefinite fester)

  1. party
  2. celebration
  3. festival
  4. feast
  5. fête

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German festi, from Proto-Germanic *fastuz; see there for cognates and further etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fest (comparative fester, superlative am festesten)

  1. firm; compact; hard
  2. firm; fixed; rigid
  3. firm; steadfast

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

  • Fest – n. festival
  • feste – adv. hard, firmly

Further reading[edit]

  • fest in Duden online

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *pëčɜ- (color; to color)[1] +‎ -t (causative suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fest

  1. to paint
  2. to dye
  3. (intransitive) to look somehow
    Hogy fest?What does it look like?
    • 1989, John Updike (author), Árpád Göncz (translator), Így látja Roger [Roger's Version], Budapest: Európa Könyvkiadó, ISBN 9630749483, page 203:
      Dale nem festett valami jól; viaszos sápadtsága szinte beteges volt. S mintha izzadt volna; ingzubbonya fölé kockás sportzakót vett, s e kettő nagyon nem illett össze.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German vest, from Old High German festi, from Proto-Germanic *fastuz. Cognate with German fest, Dutch vast, English fast, Icelandic fastur.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fest (masculine festen, neuter fest, comparative méi fest, superlative am feststen)

  1. firm, hard
  2. solid
  3. rigid
  4. fixed, fast

Declension[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

fest

  1. to feast

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin festum

Noun[edit]

fest m (definite singular festen, indefinite plural fester, definite plural festene)

  1. celebration, party
  2. (religion) feast, festival
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

fest

  1. imperative of feste

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin festum

Noun[edit]

fest m (definite singular festen, indefinite plural festar, definite plural festane)

  1. celebration, party
  2. (religion) feast, festival

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German fest.

Adverb[edit]

fest

  1. (Silesian dialects) firmly, strongly

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German fest

Adverb[edit]

fest (Cyrillic spelling фест)

  1. (Kajkavian) very
  2. (Kajkavian) intensively
  3. (Kajkavian) tightly, strongly, firmly

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fest c

  1. party, celebration

Declension[edit]

Declension of fest 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fest festen fester festerna
Genitive fests festens festers festernas

Derived terms[edit]


Yola[edit]

Noun[edit]

fest

  1. fist

References[edit]

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)