fess

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From confess, by shortening.

Verb[edit]

fess (third-person singular simple present fesses, present participle fessing, simple past and past participle fessed)

  1. To confess; to admit.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French fesse, an alteration of faisse, from Latin fascia. Doublet of fascia.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fess (plural fesses)

  1. (heraldry) A horizontal band across the middle of the shield.
    • 1892, Arthur Conan Doyle, ‘The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor’, Norton 2005 p.294:
      Lord Robert Walsingham de Vere St. Simon, second son of the Duke of Balmoral—Hum! Arms: Azure, three caltrops in chief over a fess sable.
    • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, p. 420:
      The space where the arms of Wolsey used to be is being repainted with his own newly granted arms: azure, on a fess between three lions rampant or, a rose gules, barbed vert, between two Cornish choughs proper.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Viennese German fesch (smart, stylish), from English fashionable.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fess (comparative fessebb, superlative legfessebb)

  1. (colloquial, dated) smart, stylish, chic

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French fesse

Noun[edit]

fess

  1. bottom, buttock, arse

Reference[edit]

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

·fess

  1. passive singular perfect prototonic of ro·finnadar

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
·fess ·ḟess ·fess
pronounced with /-v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Seychellois Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French fesse

Noun[edit]

fess

  1. bottom, buttock, arse

Reference[edit]

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français