chic

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See also: Chic

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French chic (elegant), probably from German Schick (elegant appearance; tasteful presentation), from Middle High German schicken (to outfit oneself, fit in, arrange appropriately), causative of Middle High German geschehen, geschēn (to happen, rush), from Old High German giskehan (to happen), from Proto-Germanic *skehaną (to run, move quickly), from Proto-Indo-European *skek- (to run, jump, spring). The word is akin to Dutch schielijk (hasty), schikken (to arrange), Old English scēon (to happen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

chic (comparative chicer or more chic, superlative chicest or most chic)

  1. Elegant, stylish.
    • 1842 December – 1844 July, Charles Dickens, “From which It will be Seen that Martin Became a Lion on His Own Account. Together with the Reason Why.”, in The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit, London: Chapman and Hall, 193, Piccadilly, published 1844, OCLC 977517776, page 277:
      Mrs. Hominy, sir, is the lady of Major Hominy, one of our chicest spirits; and belongs Toe[sic] one of our most aristocratic families.
    • 1847, Je—mes Pl—sh [pseudonym; William Makepeace Thackeray], “Crinoline”, in Punch, or The London Charivari, volume XIII, London: Published at the office, 85, Fleet Street, OCLC 732224722, page 72, column 2:
      As he wisht to micks with the very chicest sosaity, and git the best of infmation about this country, Munseer Jools of coarse went and lodgd in Lester Square— []
    • 1870 July, “Parisine”, in London Society. An Illustrated Magazine of Light and Amusing Literature for the Hours of Relaxation, volume XVIII, number CIII, London: [Printed by William Clowes and Sons], OCLC 939238636, pages 13–14:
      There are chic Cercles; or rather, there is only one, the Jockey Club. Why? Nobody can tell. Other Cercles are just as select, as exclusive, as well constituted, but not so chic. [] [T]he Jockey Club is so extremely chic, that many people consider the fact of belonging to it not as an ordinary circumstance, but as a dignity.
    • 1877 September, A. de F., “Chic”, in Temple Bar: A London Magazine for Town and Country Readers, volume LI, London: Richard Bentley & Son, [] ; New York, N.Y.: Willmer and Rogers; Paris: Galignani, OCLC 177729571, page 118:
      What is chic may, in a sense, be fashionable, but what is fashionable cannot be chic. Anybody can wear and do what is fashionable. It is not fashionable unless a lot of people do it, and have it on—until, in three words that grate rather upon the ear, in this connection, it is common. Chic cannt be common.
    • 1915 February, “Told in the Boudoir: Concerning Coiffures in General and in Particular”, in Frank Crowninshield, editor, Vanity Fair, volume 3, number 6, New York, N.Y.: Vanity Fair Publishing Company, OCLC 423870134, page 74, column 1:
      The hair is actually cut about the ears like that of the quaint Dutch children from the little Island of Martken. This style of coiffure gives to the grown child a chic appearance and naive insouciance that is very fascinating. The hair is worn, either parted on the side or in the middle, and is held with a jeweled band or a fillet of ribbon which is most effective. It seems a fashion not likely to be adopted to any great extent by really smart women, although La Valliere, the chic little Parisian actress, is fascinating in this style of head-dress, []
    • 2010, Andrew Saint, “South and North”, in Richard Norman Shaw, revised (2nd) edition, New Haven, Conn.; London: Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press, →ISBN, page 61:
      For Murray Marks he [Richard Norman Shaw] designed a chic Oxford Street shopfront for the display of 'pots' (1875–6), []
    • 2013, Jenna Mahoney, “Do Some Semi-homemade”, in Mary Hern, editor, Small Apartment Hacks: 101 Ingenious DIY Solutions for Living, Organizing, and Entertaining, Berkeley, Calif.: Ulysses Press, →ISBN, part 3 (Entertaining), page 163:
      Spanish Manchego cheese seems so much chicer than cheddar, but either pairs well with almonds, dried fruit, and rice crackers.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

chic (countable and uncountable, plural chics)

  1. (chiefly uncountable) Good form; style.
    • 1877 September, A. de F., “Chic”, in Temple Bar: A London Magazine for Town and Country Readers, volume LI, London: Richard Bentley & Son, [] ; New York, N.Y.: Willmer and Rogers; Paris: Galignani, OCLC 177729571, page 115:
      A little pear-grey glove, dropped and abandoned on the floor, may give its owner's sex and chic to the whole room; whilst an entire house-full of so-called womanly trifles will have only a neuter flavour about them, if chic be not there.
    • 2007, Matthew Craske, “A New Theatre of Death and Commemoration”, in The Silent Rhetoric of the Body: A History of Monumental Sculpture and Commemorative Art in England, 1720–1770, New Haven, Conn.; London: Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press, →ISBN, page 60:
      [T]he macabre, when celebrated with the panache of a new range of retailed products, became a glib manifestation of chic: []
    • 2014, Susan Falls, “Notes [Notes to Chapter 5]”, in Clarity, Cut, and Culture: The Many Meanings of Diamonds, New York, N.Y.; London: New York University Press, →ISBN, footnote 4, page 195:
      Terms such as "ghetto chic" and "gangsta' chic" are part of a cluster of high-fashion terms that describe styles that are in vogue but set against mainstream norms. Other "chics" include "nerd chic," "geek chic," and the controversial "heroin chic," in which models appear as drug addicts []
  2. (countable) A person with (a particular type of) chic.
    • 1978, Nelly Wilson, “Anarchism”, in Bernard-Lazare: Antisemitism and the Problem of Jewish Identity in Late Nineteenth-century France, paperback edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, published 2010, →ISBN, part I (Before the Dreyfus Affair), page 47:
      It was probably fortunate for him [Bernard Lazare] that the police, who started keeping a fairly regular watch on his activities in April 1893, also inclined towards thinking that he was merely following the fashion of other young ‘bourgeois chics’ (though at times they evidently had second thoughts).
    • 1995, Pierre Maranda, “Beyond Postmodernism: Resonant Anthropology”, in Gilles Bibeau and Ellen Corin, editors, Beyond Textuality: Asceticism and Violence in Anthropological Interpretation (Approaches to Semiotics; 120), Berlin; New York, N.Y.: Mouton de Gruyter, →ISBN, page 329:
      Striving for admission in those exclusive circles so as to gain higher social recognition and acceptance by the chics, anthropologists who were already subservient to other philosophical musings such as hermeneutics and phenomenology, started to upgrade their language and to treat cultures as "texts".
    • 2005, Pamela Anderson, Star Struck, New York, N.Y.: Atria Books, →ISBN, page 149:
      The potheads were either smoking or eating or giggling or some combination of the three. The heroin chics were nodding out.

Usage notes[edit]

The noun chic is very often used with an attributive noun or adjective modifier, indicating the kind of style, such as “boho-chic”, “heroin chic”, “shabby chic”, and so on.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French chic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

chic (comparative chicimpi, superlative chicein)

  1. chic

Declension[edit]

Inflection of chic (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative chic chicit
genitive chicin chicien
partitive chiciä chicejä
illative chiciin chiceihin
singular plural
nominative chic chicit
accusative nom. chic chicit
gen. chicin
genitive chicin chicien
partitive chiciä chicejä
inessive chicissä chiceissä
elative chicistä chiceistä
illative chiciin chiceihin
adessive chicillä chiceillä
ablative chiciltä chiceiltä
allative chicille chiceille
essive chicinä chiceinä
translative chiciksi chiceiksi
instructive chicein
abessive chicittä chiceittä
comitative chiceine

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from German Schick (elegant appearance; tasteful presentation), from Middle High German schicken (to outfit oneself, fit in, arrange appropriately), causative of Middle High German geschehen, geschēn (to happen, rush), from Old High German giskehan (to happen), from Proto-Germanic *skehaną (to run, move quickly), from Proto-Indo-European *skek- (to run, jump, spring). The word is akin to Dutch schielijk (hasty), schikken (to arrange), Old English scēon (to happen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

chic (plural chic or chics)

  1. elegant
  2. considerate

Usage notes[edit]

Chic is either used invariably, in which case the spelling of the plural is chic, or has the plural chics for both the masculine and the feminine forms.

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

chic m (plural chic)

  1. elegance
  2. skillfulness; adroitness

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʃɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Adjective[edit]

chic (comparative chicer, superlative am chicsten)

  1. Alternative spelling of schick

Usage notes[edit]

  • While the spelling chic is correct for the uninflected adjective, all inflected forms are nonstandard. Correctly, inflected forms must be derived from the preferred spelling schick.

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • chic in Duden online

Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

chic

  1. Lenited form of cic.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French chic.

Adjective[edit]

chic (plural chics)

  1. elegant

Noun[edit]

chic m (plural chics)

  1. elegance