fester

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French festre (cognate with Italian fistola, Occitan fistola, Spanish fístula), from Latin fistula. The verb is derived from the noun, while the “condition of something that festers” noun sense is derived from the verb.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fester (plural festers)

  1. (pathology, obsolete) A fistula.
  2. (pathology) A sore or an ulcer of the skin.
    • 1848, Samuel Maunder, “SPIDERS. (Arachnida.)”, in The Treasury of Natural History; or, A Popular Dictionary of Animated Nature: In which the Zoological Characteristics that Distinguish the Different Classes, Genera, and Species, are Combined with a Variety of Interesting Information Illustrative of the Habits, Instincts, and General Economy of the Animal Kingdom. To which are Added, a Syllabus of Practical Taxidermy, and a Glossarial Appendix. [...], London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, Paternoster-Row, OCLC 956545938, page 637, column 1:
      The larger the Spider, the warmer the climate or season of the year, and the more susceptible the wounded individual, so much worse will the effects be; and it is no therefore no wonder that people who would have a fester from a simple prick with a needle, should feel more violent effects from the bite of a Spider.
    • 1861, Benjamin Ridge, “Medical and Self Torture”, in Ourselves, Our Food, and Our Physic, London: Chapman and Hall, 193 Piccadilly, OCLC 83201861, page 68:
      While to the fingers and toes, which are frequently the seat of spontaneous festers, &c., irritation is kept up [if a hot poultice is applied], the skin is thickened, and rendered less liable to be permeated by matter; the heat is driven down the soft structures to the very bones and joints, and a portion of them may be lost in consequence.
    • 1864 July, “The Rim. Part III.—Conclusion.”, in The Atlantic Monthly. A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politcs, volume XIV, number LXXXI, Boston, Mass.: Ticknor and Fields, 135, Washington Street; London: Trübner and Company, OCLC 612185692, page 68:
      He has been away so long and so often, there has been such mismanagement under a long minority, such changes and such misrule, such a hard hand and such a high hand, that the whole place is a fester.
  3. The condition of something that festers; a festering; a festerment.

Verb[edit]

fester (third-person singular simple present festers, present participle festering, simple past and past participle festered)

  1. (intransitive) To become septic; to become rotten.
  2. (intransitive) To worsen, especially due to lack of attention.
    Deal with the problem immediately; do not let it fester.
  3. (transitive) To cause to fester or rankle.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fester c

  1. plural indefinite of fest

Verb[edit]

fester

  1. present tense of feste

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fester

  1. inflected form of fest

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

fester m

  1. indefinite plural of fest

Verb[edit]

fester

  1. present tense of feste

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fester

  1. indefinite plural of fest