patriarcha

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Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek πατριάρχης (patriárkhēs)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

patriarcha m (genitive patriarchae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin) patriarch (all senses)

Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative patriarcha patriarchae
genitive patriarchae patriarchūm
patriarchārum
dative patriarchae patriarchīs
accusative patriarcham patriarchās
ablative patriarchā patriarchīs
vocative patriarcha patriarchae

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • pătrĭarcha and pătrĭarches in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “PATRIARCHAE”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre, page PATRIARCHÆ
  • pătrĭarcha (-ēs)” on page 1,125/3 of Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “patriarcha”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus (in Latin), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 773–774
  • patriarcha in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 27.02.03) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Noun[edit]

patriarcha m pers

  1. patriarch

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

patriarcha m (plural patriarchas)

  1. Obsolete spelling of patriarca (used in Portugal until September 1911 and died out in Brazil during the 1920s).