brut

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Brut, brüt, and brût

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French brut (raw), from Middle French brut, from Old French brut, from Latin brūtus (heavy).

Adjective[edit]

brut (comparative more brut, superlative most brut)

  1. (of champagne) very dry, and not sweet

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin brūtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brut (feminine bruta, masculine plural bruts, feminine plural brutes)

  1. unrefined, unpurified
  2. dirty
    Synonyms: sutze, llord
    Antonym: net
  3. gross

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin brūtus.

Adjective[edit]

brut (feminine bruta)

  1. ugly
  2. bad

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French brut, from Old French brut, from Latin brūtus (heavy, dull).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brut (feminine brute, masculine plural bruts, feminine plural brutes)

  1. gross
    Antonym: net
    produit national brut(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  2. raw
    sucre brut(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  3. (drinks) brut, strong
    Coordinate term: sec

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: brut
  • German: brut
  • Turkish: brüt

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French brut, from Latin brūtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brut (strong nominative masculine singular bruter, not comparable)

  1. brut

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • brut” in Duden online
  • brut” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Old High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *brūdi, whence also Old Saxon brūd, Old English brȳd, Old Norse brúðr,

Noun[edit]

brūt f

  1. bride

Coordinate terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin brutus or French brut.

Adjective[edit]

brut m or n (feminine singular brută, masculine plural bruți, feminine and neuter plural brute)

  1. gross (as opposed to net)

Declension[edit]


Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German brōt

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brūt n (plural brut) (diminutive brutła)

  1. bread
  2. loaf (of bread)

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse brjóta, from Proto-Germanic *breutaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrewd-. Through vowel-substitution also found as bryt, bryit; compare bruttu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

brut (preterite bröjt or braut, supine brutti)

  1. (transitive, with å or sånder) to break; to divide abruptly or remove a piece from something by breaking it
    skikkä säg sä, att’n braut å bäinä
    It so happened, that he broke his leg.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]