brot

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See also: Brot, brót, bröt, brøt, and Brot.

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

brot m (plural brots)

  1. (botany) shoot
  2. (figuratively) outbreak
  3. (idiomatic) stroke of work

Related terms[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin brūtus.

Adjective[edit]

brot

  1. ugly
  2. bad

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse brot.

Noun[edit]

brot n (genitive singular brots, plural brot)

  1. breaking, break, breach, rupture
  2. breach, infringement, violation
  3. extract, fraction

Declension[edit]

Declension of brot
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative brot brotið brot brotini
accusative brot brotið brot brotini
dative broti brotinum brotum brotunum
genitive brots brotsins brota brotanna

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse brot, akin to Old English gebrot, Middle English brotel

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brot n (genitive singular brots, nominative plural brot)

  1. a fracture
  2. a violation
  3. (mathematics) a fraction

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *braudą, whence also Old Saxon brōd (German Low German Broot[1]), Old English brēad (English bread), Old Frisian brād (West Frisian brea), Dutch brood, Old Norse brauð (Icelandic brauð).

Noun[edit]

brōt n

  1. bread
    • unsar brōt tagalīhhaz gib uns hiutu (The Lord's Prayer, circa 830)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Polabian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Noun[edit]

brot m

  1. brother

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English broth.

Noun[edit]

brot m (genitive singular brota, plural brotan)

  1. soup
  2. broth

References[edit]