five

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See also: Five

Translingual[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English five.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

five

  1. (international standards) NATO & ICAO phonetic alphabet code for the numeral 5.
    Synonym: pantafive (ITU/IMO)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Annex 10 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation: Aeronautical Telecommunications; Volume II Communication Procedures including those with PANS status[1], 6th edition, International Civil Aviation Organization, October 2001, retrieved 23 January 2019, page §5.2.1.4.3.1

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English numbers (edit)
50
 ←  4 5 6  → 
    Cardinal: five
    Ordinal: fifth
    Latinate ordinal: quintary, quinary
    Adverbial: five times
    Multiplier: fivefold
    Latinate multiplier: quintuple
    Distributive: quintuply
    Collective: fivesome
    Greek or Latinate collective: pentad
    Greek collective prefix: penta-
    Latinate collective prefix: quinque-
    Multiuse collective: quintuplet, pentuplet
    Fractional: fifth
    Greek prefix: pempto-
    Number of musicians: quintet

Alternative forms[edit]

  • Arabic numerals: 5 (see for numerical forms in other scripts)
  • Roman numerals: V

Etymology[edit]

PIE word
*pénkʷe

From Middle English five, vif, fif, from Old English fīf (five), from Proto-West Germanic *fimf (five), from Proto-Germanic *fimf (five) (compare West Frisian fiif, Dutch vijf, German fünf, Norwegian and Swedish fem, Icelandic fimm), from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe (compare Welsh pump, Latin quinque, Tocharian A päñ, Tocharian B piś, Lithuanian penki, Russian пять (pjatʹ), Albanian pesë, pêsë, Ancient Greek πέντε (pénte), Armenian հինգ (hing), Persian پنج(panj), Sanskrit पञ्च (páñca)). Doublet of cinque, punch, pimp, and Pompeii.

The nasal *m in Proto-Germanic *fimf was lost through a sound change known as the Ingvaeonic nasal spirant law.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

Five dots

five

  1. A numerical value equal to 5; the number following four and preceding six.
    • 2006, Donald Ringe, From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic (A Linguistic History of English; 1)‎[2], Oxford: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 197:
      The r-stems had apparently been reduced to the five nuclear kinship terms that still survive in Modern English.
  2. Describing a group or set with five elements.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

five (plural fives)

  1. The digit/figure 5.
    He wrote a five followed by four zeroes.
  2. A banknote with a denomination of five units of currency. See also fiver.
    Can anyone here change a five?
  3. Anything measuring five units, as length.
    All the fives are over there in the corner, next to the fours.
  4. A person who is five years old.
    The fives and sixes will have a snack first, then the older kids.
  5. Five o'clock.
    See you at five.
  6. A short rest, especially one of five minutes.
    Take five, soldier.
  7. (basketball) A basketball team, club or lineup.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Playing cards in English · playing cards (layout · text)
Ace of spades.svg 2 of spades.svg 3 of spades.svg 4 of spades.svg 5 of spades.svg 6 of spades.svg 7 of spades.svg
ace deuce, two three four five six seven
8 of spades.svg 9 of spades.svg 10 of spades.svg Jack of spades2.svg Queen of spades2.svg King of spades2.svg Joker black 02.svg
eight nine ten jack, knave queen king joker

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Middle English numbers (edit)
50
 ←  4 5 6  → 
    Cardinal: five
    Ordinal: fifte

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English fīf, from Proto-West Germanic *fimf, from Proto-Germanic *fimf, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe.

Though Old English fīf was usually indeclinable, inflected forms of it are far from unknown. Forms with final -v- originate from intervocalic voicing in these inflected forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

five

  1. five

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: five
  • Scots: five, fif, fife, fyve
  • Yola: veeve

References[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English five, from Old English fīf, from Proto-Germanic *fimf, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cardinal number
5 Previous: fower
Next: sax

five

  1. five

Related terms[edit]


Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French fievre, from Latin febris, from Proto-Italic *feɣʷris, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰris. Cognates include French fièvre and Norman fièvre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

five f (plural fives)

  1. fever
  2. delirium

References[edit]

  • Simon Stasse (2004) Dictionaire Populaire de Wallon Liegeois[3], Société Royale Littéraire "La Wallonne"