fem

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: femme, FEM, fém, fem., and fem-

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of feminine

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɛm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Noun[edit]

fem (plural fems)

  1. (LGBT, uncommon) Synonym of femme
    Antonym: butch
    • 2014, Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, Madeline D. Davis, Boots of Leather, Slippers of Gold: The History of a Lesbian Community, Routledge (→ISBN)
      Oral history gave them an opportunity to share their vision of the world across generations, while giving us a chance to imagine the pleasure and pain of daily life for butches and fems in an earlier period.
  2. (colloquial, sometimes derogatory) A feminine or effeminate person.
    • 2014, D Shuckerow, Take off your masc: The hegemonic gay male's gender performance on Grindr, quoting someone on Grindr:
      "Versatile, but love to bottom [...] No divas or fems. Not homophobic at all, just my personal preference."
    • 2018, Luis Menéndez-Antuña, Thinking Sex with the Great Whore: Deviant Sexualities and Empire in the Book of Revelation, Routledge (→ISBN):
      [...] chasers looking for silver daddies, exec types for college jocks, straights for gays, fems for mascs, smooths for hairies, huskies for slims, blacks for Latinos, whites for Asians, straights for gays, white collars for blue collars, ...

Adjective[edit]

fem (comparative more fem, superlative most fem)

  1. (colloquial) Feminine, effeminate.
    Antonym: masc
  2. (LGBT) Synonym of femme
    Antonym: butch
    • 2007, Cameron McCarthy, Globalizing Cultural Studies: Ethnographic Interventions in Theory, Method, and Policy, Peter Lang (→ISBN), page 79:
      Dozens of queers, including female to male/male to female transsexuals, leathers, bears and bisexuals, butch and fem lesbians, []

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin fimum.

Noun[edit]

fem m (plural fems)

  1. dung
  2. (chiefly in the plural) manure (animal excrement used as fertilizer)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

fem

  1. first-person plural present indicative form of fer
  2. first-person plural present subjunctive form of fer
  3. first-person plural imperative form of fer

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish cardinal numbers
 <  4 5 6  > 
    Cardinal : fem
    Ordinal : femte

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fimm, from Proto-Germanic *fimf, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe (five).

Numeral[edit]

fem

  1. five

Elfdalian[edit]

Elfdalian cardinal numbers
 <  4 5 6  > 
    Cardinal : fem
    Ordinal : femt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fimm, from Proto-Germanic *fimf. Cognate with Swedish fem.

Numeral[edit]

fem

  1. five

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian cardinal numbers
 <  4 5 6  > 
    Cardinal : fem
    Ordinal : femte

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fimm (five), from Proto-Germanic *fimf, ultimately from *pémpe, variant of Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

fem

  1. five

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fimm (five)

Numeral[edit]

fem

  1. five

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) fim
  • (Puter, Vallader) füm

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fūmus.

Noun[edit]

fem m

  1. (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) smoke

Swedish[edit]

Swedish cardinal numbers
 <  4 5 6  > 
    Cardinal : fem
    Ordinal : femte

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fimm (five), from Proto-Germanic *fimf, ultimately from *pémpe, variant of Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

fem

  1. five

Coordinate terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English fermentation.

Noun[edit]

fem (nominative plural fems)

  1. fermentation

Declension[edit]