delirium

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See also: Delirium and delírium

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin dēlīrium (derangement”, “madness), from dēlīrō (I am deranged).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

delirium (plural deliriums or deliria)

  1. A temporary mental state with a sudden onset, usually reversible, including symptoms of confusion, inability to concentrate, disorientation, anxiety, and sometimes hallucinations. Causes can include dehydration, drug intoxication, and severe infection.
    • Washington Irving
      The popular delirium [of the French Revolution] at first caught his enthusiastic mind.
    • Motley
      the delirium of the preceding session (of Parliament)

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dēlīrō (I deviate from the straight track; I am deranged), from (from, away from, out of) + līra (the earth thrown up between two furrows; a ridge, track, furrow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dēlīrium n (genitive dēlīriī); second declension

  1. delirium, madness, frenzy
    • c. 47 CE, Aulus Cornelius Celsus, De Medicina, 2.7.28
      [] aut qui febre aeque non quiescente simul et delirio et spirandi difficultate vexatur []
      [] or when, likewise without the fever subsiding, he is distressed at once by delirium and difficulty in breathing []

Inflection[edit]

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative dēlīrium dēlīria
genitive dēlīriī dēlīriōrum
dative dēlīriō dēlīriīs
accusative dēlīrium dēlīria
ablative dēlīriō dēlīriīs
vocative dēlīrium dēlīria

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Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dēlīrium, from dēlīrō (I am deranged), from (from, away from, out of) + līra (the earth thrown up between two furrows; a ridge, track, furrow).

Noun[edit]

delirium n

  1. delirium

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Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

delirium n

  1. delirium

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