symptom

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See also: Symptom

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek σύμπτωμα (súmptōma, a happening, accident, symptom of disease), from stem of συμπίπτω (sumpíptō, Ι befall), from συν- (sun-, together) + πίπτω (píptō, I fall).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɪm(p)təm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: symp‧tom

Noun[edit]

symptom (plural symptoms)

  1. (medicine) A perceived change in some function, sensation or appearance of a person that indicates a disease or disorder, such as fever, headache or rash; strictly, a symptom is felt or experienced by the patient, while a sign can be detected by an observer.
    Swollen breasts, morning sickness, and a missed period are classic symptoms of pregnancy.
  2. (figuratively) A signal; anything that indicates, or is characteristic of, the presence of something else, especially of something undesirable.
    • 1837, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Ethel Churchill, volume 1, pages 114-115:
      "Nay, nay," exclaimed Lord Norbourne, "I cannot go quite so far as that. I have, thanks to your hospitality, laid in a stock of health enough for the ensuing winter: but as to the general benevolence of which you talk, I confess I find no symptoms: if I did, they would alarm me more than those of the gout."
    • 2009, Charles Zastrow, Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare:
      Some people see birth outside of marriage as a social problem—a sign of a breakdown in the traditional family and a symptom of moral decay.
    Lying, hiding one's true feelings, and having affairs are typical symptoms of a doomed marriage.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • Treatment of symptoms versus treatment of cause

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Symptom[1] from Ancient Greek σύμπτωμα (súmptōma, a happening, accident, symptom of disease), from stem of συμπίπτω (sumpíptō, Ι befall), from συν- (sun-, together) + πίπτω (píptō, I fall).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

symptom m

  1. symptom
    Synonym: příznak

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "symptom" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

Further reading[edit]

  • symptom in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • symptom in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

symptom n (singular definite symptomet, plural indefinite symptomer)

  1. symptom

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek σύμπτωμα (súmptōma, chance, casuality; symptom), from συμπίπτω (sumpíptō, Ι befall) (with the suffix, -μα (-ma), from Proto-Indo-European *-mn̥), from both συν- (sun-, with, together), from σύν (sún, beside, with), from Proto-Indo-European *som-, from *sem- (together, one), or possibly from *ḱóm (beside, near, by, with), from *ḱe + and from πίπτω (píptō, to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *pípth₂-, from *peth₂- (to spread out, fly).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sʏmpˈtuːm/
  • Rhymes: -uːm
  • Hyphenation: symp‧tom

Noun[edit]

symptom n (definite singular symptomet, indefinite plural symptom or symptomer, definite plural symptoma or symptomene)

  1. symptom

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Noun[edit]

symptom n (definite singular symptomet, indefinite plural symptom, definite plural symptoma)

  1. symptom

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

symptom m inan

  1. symptom

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • symptom in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • symptom in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

In the Swedish language since 1730. From Ancient Greek σύμπτωμα (súmptōma, a happening, accident, symptom of disease).

Noun[edit]

symptom n

  1. Dated form of symtom (symptom).