knave

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English knave, knafe, from Old English cnafa (child, boy, youth; servant), from Proto-Germanic *knabô (boy, youth), from Proto-Indo-European *gnebʰ- (to press, tighten), from Proto-Indo-European *gen- (to pinch, squeeze, bend, press together, ball). Cognate with German Knabe (lad), Dutch knaap (lad), Danish knabe, Icelandic knapi. Related also to knape.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

knave (plural knaves)

  1. (archaic) A boy; especially, a boy servant.
  2. (archaic) Any male servant; a menial.
  3. A tricky, deceitful fellow; a dishonest person.
    Synonyms: rogue, villain
  4. (card games) A playing card marked with the figure of a servant or soldier; a jack.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English cnafa, from Proto-Germanic *knabô. Compare knape.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

knave (plural knaves or knaven)

  1. son, male child (offspring)
  2. boy, lad, male child or baby
  3. guy, bloke, man
  4. servant, hireling, menial
  5. peasant, lowly individual
  6. infantryman, soldier
  7. knave, caitiff, despicable individual

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: knave
  • Scots: knave, knafe, knaif

References[edit]