mozo

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Mozo, mōzõ, možo, and móžo

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mozo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈməʊzəʊ/, /ˈmoθo/

Noun[edit]

mozo (plural mozos)

  1. A male servant, especially an attendant to a bullfighter.
    • 1992, Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses:
      When he rode up to the gerente’s house that morning he was accompanied by four friends and by a retinue of mozos and two packanimals saddled with hardwood kiacks, one empty, the other carrying their noon provisions.
  2. A title of respect for a young man (usually unmarried) with or without a name used. (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought):
  3. An unmarried man, a boy. (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought):

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese moço (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria) of unknown origin. Cognate with Portuguese moço, Asturian mozu, and Spanish mozo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmoθo̝/, (western) /ˈmoso̝/

Noun[edit]

mozo m (plural mozos, feminine moza, feminine plural mozas)

  1. boy; teenager; young man; single man
    Synonyms: homiño, rapaz
  2. boyfriend
    Xa é unha mulleriña; mesmo botou mozo.
    She's already a young lady; she even has a boyfriend now.
    Synonym: noivo
  3. (archaic) junior (person that is younger than other person)
    • 1485, M. Lucas Álvarez and P. Lucas Domínguez (eds.), El monasterio de San Clodio do Ribeiro en la Edad Media: estudio y documentos. Sada: Edicións do Castro, page 709:
      Vasco d'Oseve o mozo, fillo de Vasco d'Oseve o vello
      Vasco de Oseve junior, son of Vasco de Oseve senior

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mozo m (feminine singular moza, masculine plural mozos, feminine plural mozas)

  1. young; younger
    Alá foron os anos mozos!
    The young years are over!

References[edit]

  • moço” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • moço” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • mozo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • mozo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mozo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Potawatomi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

mozo

  1. moose

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain origin, probably ultimately identical with muchacho (cf. mocho), or from Latin musteus (must-like, of new wine, fresh), from musteum, from mustum. Other theories include a pre-Roman origin. Compare Portuguese moço, Galician mozo, Asturian mozu. Cf. also Catalan mosso (taken from Spanish) and motxo. There may alternatively be a link to Italian mozzo (cut off, docked), French mousse (blunt).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mozo m (plural mozos, feminine moza, feminine plural mozas)

  1. boy, lad, young man, youth (male adolescent or young adult); see also moza
  2. servant, helper, steward, manservant (man hired to serve or help another person); see also moza
  3. (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Peru) waiter, server (man who serves customers at their tables in a restaurant, café or similar); see also moza
  4. cat, tomcat (domesticated subspecies (Felis silvestris catus) of feline animal)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: mosso
  • Yosondúa Mixtec: musu

Adjective[edit]

mozo (feminine singular moza, masculine plural mozos, feminine plural mozas)

  1. young, youthful (of, or seeming to be of, a young age)
  2. unmarried (having no husband or wife)

Further reading[edit]