Oscar

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: oscar, OSCAR, Óscar, and Òscar

Translingual[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Oscar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Oscar

  1. (international standards) NATO, ICAO, ITU & IMO phonetic alphabet code for the letter O.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Annex 10 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation: Aeronautical Telecommunications; Volume II Communication Procedures including those with PANS status[1], 6th edition, International Civil Aviation Organization, October 2001, retrieved 23 January 2019, page §5.2.1.3, Figure 5–1

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Exact origin uncertain. Resuscitated by James Mcpherson in The Works of Ossian (1765). Napoleon, an admirer of the Ossianic poems, chose it for his godson Oscar Bernadotte, who became a king of Sweden.

Possibly from Middle Irish Oscar (the name of Fionn Mac Cumhaill's grandson in Irish mythology), from Middle Irish os (deer) + cara (friend).

Alternatively, inherited from Old English Ōscār, Ōsgār (personal name, literally spear of the gods/spear of God), from Old English ōs (god) and gār (spear) (see Oswald). Compare German Ansgar (personal name), Danish Asker, Asger (personal name), Norwegian Asgeir (personal name), Icelandic Ásgeir (personal name).

(Academy Award): Disputed. Said to have been named by actress Bette Davis after her first husband, Harmon Oscar Nelson, or by secretary Margaret Herrick after her cousin Oscar Pierce.

Proper noun[edit]

Oscar

  1. A male given name from Irish or Old English.
    • 1765 James Macpherson, The Poems of Ossian, Tauchnitz 1847, page 192:
      My son, though alone, is brave. Oscar is like a beam of the sky: he turns around, and the people fall.
    • 2005 Marc Cerasini, etc, Operation Hell Gate, HarperEntertainment, →ISBN, page 134:
      Had a funny first name, like Oscar or maybe - no! I remember now. It was Felix. Felix Tanner.
  2. A surname from Irish [in turn originating as a patronymic], a rare anglicization of Mac Oscair (son of Oscar) (McCusker).
  3. A locale in the United States.
    1. An unincorporated community in Kentucky; named for Kentucky Representative Oscar Turner.
    2. An unincorporated community in Louisiana.
    3. An unincorporated community in Missouri; named for early settler Oscar Bradford.
    4. An unincorporated community in Oklahoma; named for local rancher Oscar W. Seay.
    5. An unincorporated community in Pennsylvania.
    6. An unincorporated community in West Virginia.
  4. (informal) An Academy Award.
  5. A statuette awarded by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • French: oscariser
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened form of Oscar Asche.

Noun[edit]

Oscar (uncountable)

  1. (rhyming slang, Australia, New Zealand) cash; money.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Oscar m

  1. a male given name, equivalent to English Oscar

Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Oscar

  1. a male given name, variant of Oskar

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Oscar

  1. a male given name, variant of Oskar

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Oscar m

  1. a male given name from Irish

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oscar in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Norwegian[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Oscar

  1. a male given name, variant of Oskar

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Oscar m

  1. a male given name, equivalent to English Oscar
  2. Academy Awards; Oscar

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:Oscar.


Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Oscar, from Middle Irish Oscar. First recorded as a Swedish given name in 1803.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Oscar c (genitive Oscars)

  1. a male given name

Usage notes[edit]

  • Borne by two kings, the name became very popular in 19th century Sweden. It returned to favor in the end of the 20th century, as the most common first name of boys born in Sweden in the 2000s decade.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Roland Otterbjörk: Svenska förnamn, Almqvist & Wiksell 1996, →ISBN
  • [2] Statistiska centralbyrån and Sture Allén, Staffan Wåhlin, Förnamnsboken, Norstedts 1995, →ISBN: 30 402 males with the given name Oscar (compared to 43 180 named Oskar) living in Sweden on December 31st, 2010, with the frequency peak in the 1990s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.