mac

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of mackintosh.

Noun[edit]

mac (plural macs)

  1. Clipping of mackintosh (a raincoat).
    • 1969, John Lennon; Paul McCartney, The Ballad of John and Yoko[1], Vevo, published 2017, 0:04 from the start:
      Standing in the dock at Southampton / Trying to get to Holland or France / The man in the mac said / You've got to go back / You know they didn't even give us a chance
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of macaroni.

Noun[edit]

mac (uncountable)

  1. (Canada, US, slang) Clipping of macaroni.
    Is there any mac and cheese left?
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

mac m (plural macs)

  1. (colloquial, slang) Clipping of maquereau (pimp).

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mac m (plural macs)

  1. (colloquial, computing) Clipping of Macintosh.

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *makkʷos, a variant of *makʷos (son), (compare Welsh mab, Gaulish mapos, Maponos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mac m (genitive singular mic, nominative plural mic)

  1. son
  2. A common prefix of many Irish and Scottish names, signifying "son of".
    Dónall óg donn Mac Lochlainnyoung, brown-haired Donald, son of the Scandinavian

Declension[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mac mhac not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


K'iche'[edit]

Noun[edit]

mac

  1. (Classical K'iche') sin

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *makkʷos, a variant of *makʷos (son), perhaps, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ḱ- (long, thin).

Noun[edit]

mac m (genitive singular mic, plural mec)

  1. son

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mac vac unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Middle Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *makkʷos, a variant of *makʷos (son), perhaps, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ḱ- (long, thin).

Noun[edit]

mac m (genitive mic, nominative plural mic)

  1. son

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: mac
  • Manx: mac
  • Scottish Gaelic: mac

Mutation[edit]

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mac mac
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *makkos. Cognate with Welsh mach.[1]

Noun[edit]

mac m

  1. bond, surety

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative mac macL maicL
Vocative maic macL macuH
Accusative macN macL macuH
Genitive maicL mac macN
Dative macL macaib macaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mac
also mmac after a proclitic
mac
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “mach”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Further reading[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a Slavic language, from Proto-Slavic *makъ (poppy), compare Serbo-Croatian and Polish mak.

Noun[edit]

mac m (plural maci)

  1. poppy
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection[edit]

mac

  1. quack (sound made by ducks)

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *makkʷos, a variant of *makʷos (son), perhaps, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ḱ- (long, thin).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mac m (genitive singular mic, plural mic)

  1. son
  2. Commonly used as a prefix of Irish and Scottish surnames, meaning son.
    MacDhòmhnaill (MacDonald, literally son of Donald, Donaldson)

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mac mhac
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • mac” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 mac, macc”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language