kin

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: kín, -kin, and kin-

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

PIE root
*ǵenh₁-

From Middle English kin, kyn, ken, kun, from Old English cynn ‎(kind, sort, rank, quality, family, generation, offspring, pedigree, kin, race, people, gender, sex, propriety, etiquette), from Proto-Germanic *kunją ‎(race, generation, descent), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- ‎(to produce). Cognate with Scots kin ‎(relatives, kinfolk), North Frisian kinn, kenn ‎(gender, race, family, kinship), Dutch kunne ‎(gender, sex), Middle Low German kunne ‎(gender, sex, race, family, lineage), German Künne, Kunne ‎(kin, kind, race), Danish køn ‎(gender, sex), Swedish kön ‎(gender, sex), Icelandic kyn ‎(gender), and through Indo-European, with Latin genus ‎(kind, sort, ancestry, birth), Ancient Greek γένος ‎(génos, kind, race), Albanian dhen ‎((herd of) small cattle).

Noun[edit]

kin ‎(uncountable)

  1. Race; family; breed; kind.
  2. (collectively) Persons of the same race or family; kindred.
    • Francis Bacon
      You are of kin, and so a friend to their persons.
  3. One or more relatives, such as siblings or cousins, taken collectively.
  4. Relationship; same-bloodedness or affinity; near connection or alliance, as of those having common descent.
  5. Kind; sort; manner; way.
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
External links[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kin ‎(not comparable)

  1. Related by blood or marriage, akin. Generally used in "kin to".
    It turns out my back-fence neighbor is kin to one of my co-workers.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

kin ‎(plural kins)

  1. A primitive Chinese musical instrument of the cittern kind, with from five to twenty-five silken strings.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Riemann to this entry?)
    • 1840, Elijah Coleman Bridgman, Samuel Wells Williams, The Chinese Repository (page 40)
      If a musician were going to give a lecture upon the mathematical part of his art, he would find a very elegant substitute for the monochord in the Chinese kin.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

kin ‎(plural kins)

  1. Alternative form of k'in

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch kinne, from Old Dutch kinni, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénu-, *ǵénus. Compare Low German and German Kinn, English chin, Danish kind, Icelandic kinn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kin f ‎(plural kinnen, diminutive kinnetje n)

  1. (anatomy) chin

Hungarian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

kin

  1. superessive singular of ki

Ido[edit]

Cardinal numeral[edit]

kin

  1. five (5)

Japanese[edit]

See also kiin

Romanization[edit]

kin

  1. rōmaji reading of きん

Kurdish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kin ?

  1. short

Synonyms[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

kin

  1. rafsi of skina.

Navajo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Dogrib kǫ̀.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kin

  1. market, store
    Kingóó déyá. ― I am going to the store.
  2. house, cabin, building
  3. town

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Ngarrindjeri[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

kin

  1. him

Tai Dam[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Lao ກິນ ‎(kin) and Thai กิน ‎(gin).

Verb[edit]

kin

  1. to eat

References[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German kinne, kin, from Old Saxon kinni, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz. Compare also Dutch kin. Compare Old Frisian zin, English chin.

Noun[edit]

kin

  1. chin

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

kin

  1. I can