-nik

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See also: nik, Nik, -nik-, -ník, ŋɪ́k, and ȵik⁷

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From the Slavic suffix represented by Russian -ник (-nik). This suffix experienced a surge in English coinages for nicknames and diminutives after the 1957 Soviet launch of the first Sputnik satellite. English usage is heavily influenced by Yiddish usage of ⁧־ניק(-nik) and similar borrowed words (nogoodnik, nudnik, kibbutznik).

Suffix[edit]

-nik

  1. Creates a nickname for a person who exemplifies, endorses, or is associated with the thing or quality specified (by the base form), often a particular ideology or preference.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Kabakchi, V. V.; Doyle, Charles Clay (Autumn 1990), “Of Sputniks, Beatniks, and Nogoodniks”, in American Speech[1], volume 65, issue 3, →JSTOR, pages 275-278

Anagrams[edit]

Basque[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

-nik

  1. Negative polarity item used to form relative clauses, that
    Ez dut esan etorriko direnik.I didn't say that they'll come.

Usage notes[edit]

The form taken by this clitic depends on the ending of the verbal form to which it is attached, see the usage notes at -n.

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Compare Ingrian -nikka, Latvian -nieks and Russian -ник (-nik).

Suffix[edit]

-nik (genitive -niku, partitive -nikku)

  1. Forms occupational agent nouns. (non-productive)
    kiri (text) + ‎-nik → ‎kirjanik (writer)
    aed (garden) + ‎-nik → ‎aednik (gardener)
    kunst (art) + ‎-nik → ‎kunstnik (artist)

Declension[edit]

Declension of -nik (ÕS type 25/õnnelik, kk-k gradation)
singular plural
nominative -nik -nikud
accusative nom.
gen. -niku
genitive -nike
-nikkude
partitive -nikku -nikke
-nikkusid
illative -nikku
-nikusse
-nikesse
-nikkudesse
inessive -nikus -nikes
-nikkudes
elative -nikust -nikest
-nikkudest
allative -nikule -nikele
-nikkudele
adessive -nikul -nikel
-nikkudel
ablative -nikult -nikelt
-nikkudelt
translative -nikuks -nikeks
-nikkudeks
terminative -nikuni -nikeni
-nikkudeni
essive -nikuna -nikena
-nikkudena
abessive -nikuta -niketa
-nikkudeta
comitative -nikuga -nikega
-nikkudega

Derived terms[edit]

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *-nikъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-nik m

  1. Forms masculine nouns referring to a performer of some action, sometimes a device; -er
    rězaś (to cut) + ‎-nik → ‎rěznik (butcher)

Declension[edit]

Animate nouns:

Inanimate nouns:

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Ojibwe[edit]

Noun[edit]

-nik (plural -nikan, obligatorily possessed)

  1. arm

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Old Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *-nikъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /niːk/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /nik/

Suffix[edit]

-nik m

  1. forms masculine nouns referring to a performer of some action, sometimes a device

Derived terms[edit]

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old Polish -nik

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɲik/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ik
  • Syllabification: nik

Suffix[edit]

-nik m

  1. forms masculine nouns referring to a performer of some action, sometimes a device; -er
    rola + ‎-nik → ‎rolnik

Declension[edit]

Personal nouns:

Impersonal nouns:

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

suffix

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *-nikъ, *-ьnikъ, itself originally by nominalization of adjectives in *-ьnъ with the suffix *-ikъ (whence -ik). The suffix originates from the Proto-Balto-Slavic period; compare with dialectal Lithuanian lauk-inykas (peasant, farmer) (from laũkas (field)) and Old Prussian lauk-inikis (vassal).

Suffix[edit]

-nik (Cyrillic spelling -ник)

  1. Suffix appended to nominal stems to create a masculine noun, usually denoting a professional, performer, adherent, place, object, tool or a feature.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Skok, Petar (1971), “-nik”, in Etimologijski rječnik hrvatskoga ili srpskoga jezika [Etymological Dictionary of the Croatian or Serbian Language] (in Serbo-Croatian), volume 1 (A – J), Zagreb: JAZU, page 515