-ik

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: ik, Ik, IK, ik', ik-, and -ík

Abenaki[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ik

  1. A suffix used to form the plurals of some animate words.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Often used to form the plurals of words (especially nouns denoting people who have particular occupations or activities) which end in the consonant d or t (which causes the d or t to mutate into j: nodabônkad, "baker" → nodabônkajik, "bakers"); only rarely used to form the plurals of words ending in other letters (nodkwaag, notkwahag, "pilot" → nodkwaagik, notkwahagik, "pilots").
  • See the usage notes at -ak.

Azerbaijani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Suffix[edit]

preceding vowel
A / I E / Ə / İ O / U Ö / Ü
postconsonantal -ıq -ik -uq -ük
postvocalic -yıq -yik -yuq -yük

-ik

  1. First-person plural present simple copula (used suppletively in place of *imək):
    1. [we] are

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *-ikko.

Suffix[edit]

-ik (genitive -iku, partitive -ikut)

  1. Derives nouns from numerals, with the meaning "group of".
    kaks (two)kaksik (twin, group of two)
    kolm (three)kolmik (triplet, group of three)
    neli (four)nelik (quadruplet, four of a kind (poker), group of four)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]



German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin -icus and Ancient Greek -ικός (-ikós).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /-ɪk/
  • (file)

Suffix[edit]

-ik

  1. forms feminine nouns referring to fields of study
  2. forms feminine collective nouns
  3. forms feminine nouns referring to characteristics

Derived terms[edit]



Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective suffix.

Suffix[edit]

-ik

  1. (adjective suffix) Specifies which one of a specific set of things/persons. Used with adjectives. See usage notes below.
    rosszabb (worse)a rosszabbik (the worse one)
    más (different)(egy) másik (another one)a másik (“the other one”)
    A nagyobbik szobában Péter lakik. ― Peter lives in the bigger room (out of a specific set of rooms).
Usage notes[edit]
  • (adjective suffix) The -ik creates a determining or specifying adjective from a comparative adjective so it will answer the question melyik? (which?). In a few cases it takes not a comparative but a positive adjective, which already incorporates the idea of comparison (e.g. más (different)). It is very often used with a definite article (a/az (the)).
Derived terms[edit]


Etymology 2[edit]

Possessive suffix.

Suffix[edit]

-ik

  1. (possessive suffix) their ...-s (third-person plural, multiple possessions)
    kapu (gate)a kapuik (their gates)
Usage notes[edit]
  • (possessive suffix) Variants:
    -ik is added to words ending in a vowel except -i. Final -a changes to -á-. Final -e changes to -é-.
    -aik is added to some back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -eik is added to some front vowel words ending in a consonant
    -jaik is added to some back vowel words ending in a consonant or the vowel -i
    -jeik is added to some front vowel words ending in a consonant or the vowel -i

Etymology 3[edit]

Personal suffix.

Suffix[edit]

-ik

  1. (personal suffix) The ending of a large group of passive/reflexive verbs in third-person singular present tense (indefinite conjugation). This is also the lemma form of these verbs.
    Sokat utazik.S/he travels a lot.
  2. (personal suffix) Used to form the third-person plural present tense of verbs (definite conjugation).
    Megnézik a filmet.They will see the movie.
    [from megnéz (to look at, to see), indicating a definite object, here rendered with the]
Usage notes[edit]

The above two senses are usually not difficult to distinguish if one knows whether the verb's dictionary form ends in -ik. If it does, it is usually not a transitive verb (since most -ik verbs have a passive or reflexive meaning) so it will be probably an (indefinite) singular. On the other hand, if the verb's dictionary form has no -ik ending, the only option is the (definite) plural. Eszik (’to eat’) is one of the few -ik verbs that are transitive. In such a case, one needs to rely on the definiteness of the object. For more details, see its Usage notes.

  • (personal suffix, definite conjugation) See harmonic variants in the table below.
Derived terms[edit]


See also[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English -iġ.

Suffix[edit]

-ik

  1. Alternative form of -y.
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French -ique, from Latin -icus, from Proto-Indo-European *-kos. Doublet of -y.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ik

  1. Forms nouns denoting a quality from adjectives; -ic.
Derived terms[edit]


Descendants[edit]
  • English: -ic
References[edit]

Polish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *-ikъ.

Suffix[edit]

-ik m

  1. Forms diminutive nouns.

Declension[edit]

(personal nouns)

(other nouns)

Derived terms[edit]



Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *-ikъ.

Suffix[edit]

-ik (Cyrillic spelling -ик)

  1. Suffix appended to words to create a masculine noun, usually denoting a profession, performer, place, object, tool or a feature.

See also[edit]


Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Presumably related to Finnish -ko.

Particle[edit]

-ik

  1. Interrogative particle. It is attached to the finite verb in yes-no questions, which is then placed first in the sentence.

Volapük[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ik

  1. Used to form adjectives and determiners.