-el

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English -el, from Old English -el, from Proto-Germanic *-ilaz.

Alternative forms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. Suffix forming nouns, originally denoting an instrument, from verbs, usually spelt -le except after n and e.
    runnel, shovel, dotel
  2. Diminutive suffix in words of Germanic origin.
    hatchel, hovel, gomeral

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English -el, a merger of two suffixes:

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. Suffix, originally diminutive, in words of mostly Romance origin.
    cupel, chapel, tunnel
Derived terms[edit]


Anagrams[edit]


Abenaki[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. Used on verbs, together with the prefix k-, to indicate that the first person singular (I) is the actor and the second person singular (you) is the object of the verb.
    n'kezalmô
    I love
    k'kezalmel
    I love you (singular)

Usage notes[edit]

The suffix is spelled -ol by some writers.

See also[edit]


Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. French -el (e.g. sexuel, individuel, industriel)

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. To make an adjective of a noun; -al
    broad (nation) + ‎-el → ‎broadel (national)

Derived terms[edit]



Danish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. -al

Derived terms[edit]



Dutch[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. -el
  2. -elle

Derived terms[edit]



Esperanto[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. in [...] way
    -el is the ending for correlatives of manner or degree

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French -el, inherited from Latin -ālis. Doublet of -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. To make an adjectival form of a noun; -al
    naturel from nature

Derived terms[edit]


Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

-e- +‎ -l

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. (personal suffix) Used to form the second-person singular present tense of verbs ending in s, sz, z, dz (indicative mood, indefinite conjugation).
    keres (to seek)keresel (you seek, you are seeking)
  2. (verb suffix) Added to a noun to form a verb.
    ebéd (lunch)ebédel (to eat lunch)
  3. (noun suffix) Added to a verb to form a noun (no longer productive in this role).
    lep (to cover)lepel (wrap)

Usage notes[edit]

  • (personal suffix) Variants:
    -sz added to verbs not in the categories listed below
    vár (to wait)vársz (you wait, you are waiting)
    -asz added to back vowel verbs ending in two consonants or -ít
    hall (to hear)hallasz (you hear, you are hearing)
    tanít (to teach)tanítasz (you teach, you are teaching)
    -esz added to front vowel verbs ending in two consonants or -ít
    dönt (to decide)döntesz (you decide, you are deciding)
    segít (to help)segítesz (you help, you are helping)
    -ol added to back vowel verbs ending in s, sz, z, dz
    olvas (to read)olvasol (you read, you are reading)
    -el added to unrounded front vowel verbs ending in s, sz, z, dz
    vesz (to buy)veszel (you buy, you are buying)
    -öl added to rounded front vowel verbs ending in s, sz, z, dz
    főz (to cook)főzöl (you cook, you are cooking)
  • (verb suffix) Variants:
    -l is added to words ending in a vowel. Final -a changes to -á-. Final -e changes to -é-. Final long vowels may shorten, e.g. űü.
    -ol is added to some back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -al is added to other back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -el is added to unrounded front vowel words ending in a consonant
    -öl is added to rounded front vowel words ending in a consonant
    -ál is added to some back vowel words ending in a consonant
  • (noun suffix) Variants:
    -al is added to back vowel words
    -el is added to front vowel words

Derived terms[edit]


See also[edit]


Low German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German -el, from Old Saxon -il, from Proto-Germanic *-ilaz.

Suffix[edit]

-el m

  1. Suffix forming nouns originally denoting an agent from verbs.
    Lepel, Snavel, Stickel

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German -ling. Result of wrong segmentation of nouns with -el and -ing suffixes. See the English suffix -ling. Akin to English, Dutch and German -ling.

Suffix[edit]

-el m

  1. A suffix that describes a male person (or other creature) in terms of a place of origin or a quality, as defined by the root to which it is added. Now often replaced by a compound with Jung for a male person, and Deern for a female person such as Lehrjung, Lehrdeern (male/female pupil).
Derived terms[edit]

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French -el, from Latin -ālis.

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. makes an adjectival form of a noun; -al

Derived terms[edit]



Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *-a-l-.

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. Alternative form of -ol

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *-ilaz.

Alternative forms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el m

  1. (causes i-mutation) agent and instrumental suffix creating nouns from verbs
    crēopan (to creep) + ‎-el → ‎crypel (cripple)
    bēodan (to command) + ‎-el → ‎bydel (herald, messenger)
    spittan (to dig) + ‎-el → ‎spitel (shovel)
    hladan (to lade) + ‎-el → ‎hlædel (ladle)
    þrēapian (to reprove, reprehend) + ‎-el → ‎þrīpel (instrument of punishment, cross)
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin -ellus and -ellum.

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. Suffix that usually denotes a masculine noun

Descendants[edit]

French : -al, -eau, -el


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin -ellus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el m (plural -ei, feminine -ea, feminine plural -ele)

  1. used to form a masculine diminutive of a word (e.g. băiat (boy) + ‎-el → ‎băiețel (little boy)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Related terms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-el

  1. Used to indicate a maker of a certain thing.

Derived terms[edit]