-ling

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See also: ling, líng, lìng, līng, and lǐng

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English -ling, from Old English -ling, from Proto-Germanic *-lingaz, a nominal suffix, probably composed of Proto-Germanic *-ilaz (agent/instrumental/diminutive suffix) + Proto-Germanic *-ingaz (patronymic suffix). Akin to Dutch -ling, German -ling, Icelandic -lingur, Gothic -𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (-liggs) (in 𐌲𐌰𐌳𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (gadiliggs)). More at -le, -ing.

Alternative forms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ling

  1. small, immature, miniature
  2. follower or resident

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Words ending in -ing derived from a root or stem terminating in -l or -le, such as dazzling, have usually only an accidental resemblance, although sometimes there is a connection, as in sidling, which derives from Middle English in this form, and which is also a present participle form of the modern English verb to sidle, which in itself is a back-formation from sidling.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English -ling, from Old English -ling, -linga, -lunga (adverbial suffix). Compare -long.

Alternative forms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ling

  1. An adverbial suffix denoting manner, direction or position.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a rebracketing of nouns with an -ing suffix. See above (English).

Suffix[edit]

-ling m

  1. A suffix that describes a person (or other creature) in terms of a place of origin or a quality, as defined by the root to which it is added.

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German -ling, from Proto-Germanic *-ilingaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [lɪŋ]
  • (file)

Suffix[edit]

-ling m (genitive -linges or -lings, plural -linge, feminine -lingin)

  1. Indicates possession of or connection with a quality or property, such as Schwächling (weakling) from schwach (weak) or Frühling (the season Spring [which comes early]) from früh (early).
  2. A modifier of nouns, meaning a follower or resident of what is denoted by the stem form, such as Häftling from Haft.

Derived terms[edit]



Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From alteration of suffixal use of Old English lang (long)

Suffix[edit]

-ling

  1. adverbial suffix denoting direction, state or position
    hinderlingbackwards

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *-ilingaz

Alternative forms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ling

  1. suffix used in forming personal nouns
    dēorlingfavorite, darling
    rǣplingprisoner, captive, criminal
  2. suffix forming diminutives
    stærlincstarling
  3. dynasty, lineage
    Icling ("dynasty of Icel" or "House of Icel"); Ætheling (House of Ethel)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]


Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: -ling