-lings

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See also: lings

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English -linges, variant (with genitive -es) of Middle English -ling (adverbial suffix), equivalent to -ling +‎ -s. Compare Dutch -lings (adverbial suffix), German -lings.

Suffix[edit]

-lings

  1. (now Britain dialectal) forming adverbs, generally of condition or situation

Derived terms[edit]


Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The suffix is a combination of the suffix -ling and the adverb-forming -s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-lings

  1. describes a manner in which an action proceeds as defined by root to which it is added, both as adverb and as adjective
    Hij dook zijdelings weg.He ducked away sideways.

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German -lingen, from Old High German lingūn. The modern form with -s is of Central and Low German origin; compare Middle Low German -linges.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-lings

  1. (rare, not productive) forms adverbs that describe the manner of an action, particularly a movement
    Bauch (abdomen, belly) + ‎-lings → ‎bäuchlings (on one’s belly)
    blind (blind) + ‎-lings → ‎blindlings (blindly, hastily, pell-mell)
    Ritt (ride) + ‎-lings → ‎rittlings (astride, sitting on something like on a mount)
    Rücken (back) + ‎-lings → ‎rücklings (one one’s back)

Usage notes[edit]

  • The suffix was common and productive into early modern German. Most adverbs with it, apart from the four named above, are now archaic.

Derived terms[edit]