ken

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See also: Ken, KEN, kén, kèn, kēn, kěn, and -ken

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɛn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English kennen (to give birth, conceive, generate, beget; to develop (as a fetus), hatch out (of eggs); to sustain, nourish, nurture), from Old English cennan (to give birth, conceive, generate, beget), from Proto-Germanic *kanjaną.

Verb[edit]

ken (third-person singular simple present kens, present participle kenning, simple past and past participle kenned)

  1. (obsolete) To give birth, conceive, beget, be born; to develop (as a fetus); to nourish, sustain (as life).

Etymology 2[edit]

Northern and Scottish dialects from Middle English kennen, from Old English cennan (make known, declare, acknowledge) originally “to make known”, causative of cunnan (to become acquainted with, to know), from Proto-Germanic *kannijaną, causative of *kunnaną (be able), from which comes the verb can. Cognate with West Frisian kenne (to know; recognise), Dutch kennen (to know), German kennen (to know, be acquainted with someone/something), Norwegian Bokmål kjenne, Norwegian Nynorsk kjenna, Old Norse kenna (to know, perceive), Swedish känna (to know, feel). See also: can, con.

The noun meaning “range of sight” is a nautical abbreviation of present participle kenning.

Verb[edit]

ken (third-person singular simple present kens, present participle kenning, simple past and past participle kenned or kent)

  1. (transitive, chiefly Scotland) To know, perceive or understand.
    • 1993, Mike Leigh, Naked:
      Johnny: Is your name Maggie? / Maggie: How'd you ken that? / Johnny: It's just a hunch. Are you looking for the, uh, petulant dwarf?
  2. (obsolete, chiefly Scotland) To discover by sight; to catch sight of; to descry.
Quotations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

ken (uncountable)

  1. Knowledge, perception, or sight.
    • 1957, United States Congressional serial set - Issue 11976:
      These people, these 20 or 25, were in my ken. Senator Jenner. In his what? Mr. Greenglass. My ken, my line of vision, my knowledge.
    • 1977, Roulhac Toledano, Sally Kittredge Evans, The Esplanade Ridge:
      On this occasion, I wrote to them: "Two more modest and deserving people than you are not in our ken; and it is but fitting that you receive this, preservation's most prestigious prize, for your selfless devotion to the cause through the years.
    • 1986, John le Carré, A Perfect Spy:
      Though he was out in the streets and away from the Firm and the Firm's ken, though he had work to do and action to relieve him, he was angry.
    • 1999, Catherine Z. Elgin, Considered Judgment:
      Since nothing in our ken differentiates knowledge from luck, something beyond our ken is introduced to do so. But the conviction that we know something is small comfort when coupled with the realization that we cannot tell what.
    • 2012, Keith McCarthy, Nor All Your Tears:
      I couldn't see the funny side myself, but Tristan could; after a while he could hardly control his merriment, in fact, so that he collapsed back on the bed, continuing to chortle, more of his rather unpleasant teeth making an unwelcome appearance in my ken.
    • 2015, Brian Bates, The Real Middle Earth:
      It was an intelligence beyond human ken but integral to everything, perhaps most like the Great Tao of Eastern philosophy of the same period, and it flowed like a European form of Chinese chi.
  2. (nautical) Range of sight.
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book I, lines 59-60:
      At once as far as Angels kenn he views
      The dismal Situation waste and wilde ...
Usage notes[edit]

In common usage a fossil word, found only in phrases such as beyond one’s ken and swim into one's ken.

Quotations[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]
  • (nautical range of sight): offing
Translations[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Perhaps from kennel.

Noun[edit]

ken (plural kens)

  1. (slang, Britain, obsolete, thieves' cant) A house, especially a den of thieves.
    • 1611, Thomas Middleton, “The Roaring Girl”, in Bullen, Arthur Henry, editor, The Works of Thomas Middleton[3], volume 4, published 1885, Act 5, Scene 1, pages 128–129:
      Ben mort, shall you and I heave a bough, mill a ken, or nip a bung, and then we'll couch a hogshead under the ruffmans, and there you shall wap with me, and I'll niggle with you.
    • 1828, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Pelham: or The Adventures of a Gentleman[4], page 383:
      Ah, Bess, my covess, strike me blind if my sees don't tout your bingo muns in spite of the darkmans. Egad, you carry a bene blink aloft. Come to the ken alone—no! my blowen; did not I tell you I should bring a pater cove, to chop up the whiners for Dawson?
    • 1851, Henry Mayhew, London Labour and the London Poor, volume 1, page 351:
      Up she goes to any likely ken, where she knows there are women that are married or expect to get married, and commences begging.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

ken (plural kens)

  1. A Japanese unit of length equal to six shakus

Anagrams[edit]


Afar[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ken

  1. they, them

See also[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ken

  1. their

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[5], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch kin, from Middle Dutch kinne, from Old Dutch kinni, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénus.

Noun[edit]

ken (plural kenne)

  1. chin
Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch kennen.

Verb[edit]

ken (present ken, present participle kennende, past participle geken)

  1. (transitive) To know (a person, a thing), be acquainted with
Derived terms[edit]

Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

ken

  1. genitive plural of ka

Breton[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ken

  1. exclamative adverb
    ken (bras)so (big)
  2. equality adverb
    (n'eo ket) ken (bras ha me)(he/she is not) so (big as me)
  3. negative adverb
    (n'ouzon ket) ken
    (I don't know) any more

Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German komen, from Old High German kweman, from Proto-Germanic *kwemaną. Cognate with German kommen, Dutch komen, English come, Icelandic koma, Gothic 𐌵𐌹𐌼𐌰𐌽 (qiman).

Verb[edit]

ken

  1. (Tredici Comuni) to come

References[edit]

  • “ken” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dupaningan Agta[edit]

Noun[edit]

ken

  1. skirt

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ken

  1. first-person singular present indicative of kennen
  2. imperative of kennen

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

(index ke)

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *ken, from Proto-Uralic *ke. Cognate with Hungarian ki and Ter Sami kie.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈken/, [ˈke̞n]
  • Rhymes: -en
  • Syllabification: ken

Pronoun[edit]

ken

  1. (interrogative, dated) who; (when followed by a modifier in elative case, -sta/-stä) which one (of + a noun referring to people).
  2. (indefinite, dated) whoever.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Ken is old-fashioned or poetic in tone (or dialectal), yet its inflected forms are common and standard. See the usage notes under kuka.

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of kéni, the verlan form of niquer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ken

  1. (vulgar, slang) Synonym of niquer
    • 2017, “Je m’isole”, in Dans l’arène, performed by Djadja & Dinaz:
      J'sais même plus laquelle j'ai ken, j'sais qu'elle kiffe la dégaine
      I don't remember which one I screwed, I know she loves the way of looking.

Usage notes[edit]

Only used as infinitive or past participle.


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of unknown origin.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ken

  1. (transitive) to smear

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(With verbal prefixes):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Further reading[edit]

  • ken in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɛn/
  • Hyphenation: kèn

Noun[edit]

ken

  1. honorific for male and female children.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Japanese (けん, ken, fist)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɛn/
  • Hyphenation: kèn

Noun[edit]

ken

  1. fist.

Further reading[edit]


Ingrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *ken, from Proto-Uralic *ke. Cognates include Veps ken and Karelian ken.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ken

  1. who?
    Ken on tää poika?Who is this boy?
  2. who, whom, that
    Hää on poika, ken ei läkkää ižoraks.He is the boy, who doesn't speak Ingrian.

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of ken
singular plural
nominative ken ket
genitive kenen kenen
partitive ketä ketä
illative kehe kehe
inessive kess kess
elative kest kest
allative kelle kelle
adessive kell kell
ablative kelt kelt
translative keks keks
essive ken ken

References[edit]

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[6]

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ken

  1. Rōmaji transcription of けん
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ケン

Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese quem.

Pronoun[edit]

ken

  1. who

Karelian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *ken, from Proto-Uralic *ke. Cognates include Finnish ken and Ingrian ken.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ken

  1. who?

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • P. M. Zaykov (1999) Грамматика Карельского языка (фонетика и морфология) [Grammar of the Karelian language (phonetics and morphology)], →ISBN, page 60

Livvi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *ken, from Proto-Uralic *ke. Cognates include Karelian ken and Ingrian ken.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈken/
  • Hyphenation: ken

Pronoun[edit]

ken

  1. who?
    Ken hyö ollah?Who are they?

References[edit]

  • N. Gilojeva; S. Rudakova (2009) Karjalan kielen Livvin murdehen algukursu [Beginners' course of Karelian language's Livvi dialect] (in Livvi), Petrozavodsk, →ISBN, page 10
  • Tatjana Boiko (2019) Suuri Karjal-Venʹalaine Sanakniigu (livvin murreh) [The Big Karelian-Russian dictionary (Livvi dialect)], 2nd edition, →ISBN, page 100

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quĕm, accusative of qui.

Pronoun[edit]

ken (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling קיין‎)

  1. who, whom
    • Dime kon ken andas, te dire ken sos.
      Tell me who you go with, I'll tell you who you are.
  2. whoever, whomever

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ken

  1. Nonstandard spelling of kén.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of kěn.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of kèn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ken ?

  1. laugh
  2. smile

Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *kuni, from Proto-Germanic *kunją, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (to give birth). Cognates include Old English cynn, Old Saxon kunni and Old Dutch cunni.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ken n

  1. kindred, kin

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian: kinne, kenne

References[edit]

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Papiamentu[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese quem and Spanish quien and Kabuverdianu ken.

Pronoun[edit]

ken

  1. who

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German kein, Dutch geen.

Article[edit]

ken

  1. no

Declension[edit]

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative ken, kee ken, kee ken, kee ken, kee
Accusative ken, kee ken, kee ken, kee ken, kee
Dative kem kenre kem ken

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English cennan (make known, declare, acknowledge), originally "make to know", causative of cunnan (to become acquainted with, to know); from Proto-West Germanic *kannijan, from Proto-Germanic *kannijaną.

Noun[edit]

ken (uncountable)

  1. knowledge or perception

Verb[edit]

ken (third-person singular present kens, present participle kennin, past kent, past participle kent)

  1. (transitive) To know, perceive or understand.
    Do ye ken John Peel with his coat so gay? - 19th century Cumbrian ballad
    • Dae ye ken Ken kens Ken?
      Do you know Ken knows Ken?"

Southern Sierra Miwok[edit]

Noun[edit]

ken

  1. no

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English can, from Middle English can, from Old English cann, from Proto-West Germanic *kann.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ken

  1. (auxiliary) to be able to
  2. (auxiliary) to may, to be allowed
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Jenesis 1:29:
      Na God i tok olsem, “Mi givim yupela ol kain kain diwai na gras i karim pikinini bilong kaikai. Na yupela i ken kisim kaikai long ol dispela samting.
      →New International Version translation
  3. (auxiliary) Expresses a wish.; may...

Further reading[edit]

  • John W. M. Verhaar (1995) , chapter 10, in Toward a reference grammar of Tok Pisin: An experiment in corpus linguistics, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i press, →ISBN, page 144

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *ken.

Pronoun[edit]

ken (genitive kenen, partitive keda)

  1. who (interrogative)

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of ken
nominative sing. ken
genitive sing. kenen
partitive sing. keda
partitive plur.
singular plural
nominative ken
accusative kenen
genitive kenen
partitive keda
essive-instructive kenen
translative keneks
inessive kes
kenes
elative kespäi
kenespäi
illative kehe
kenehe
adessive kel
kenel
ablative kelpäi
kenelpäi
allative kelle
kenele
abessive keneta
comitative kenenke
prolative kedame
approximative I kenenno
approximative II kenennoks
egressive kenennopäi
terminative I kehesai
kenehesai
terminative II kellesai
kenelesai
terminative III
additive I kehepäi
kenehepäi
additive II kellepäi
kenelepäi

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007) , “кто”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ken

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Verb[edit]

ken

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Yola[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ken.

Noun[edit]

ken

  1. regard, liking

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN

Zou[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ken

  1. wheel

References[edit]

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 41