kenna

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See also: Kenna

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse kenna, from Proto-Germanic *kannijaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

kenna (third person singular past indicative kendi, third person plural past indicative kent, supine kent)

  1. to know
  2. to feel
  3. to teach

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of kenna (group v-8)
infinitive kenna
supine kent
participle (a7)1 kennandi kendur
present past
first singular kenni kendi
second singular kennir kendi
third singular kennir kendi
plural kenna kendu
imperative
singular kenna!
plural kennið!
1Only the past participle being declined.

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse kenna, from Proto-Germanic *kannijaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

kenna (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative kenndi, supine kennt)

  1. to teach, to tutor
    • Timothy 2:11-12 (English, Icelandic)
      Konan á að læra í kyrrþey, í allri undirgefni. Ekki leyfi ég konu að kenna eða taka sér vald yfir manninum, heldur á hún að vera kyrrlát.
      A woman should learn in quietness and full submission. I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man; she must be silent.
  2. to instruct
  3. (dated) to ascribe
  4. (archaic, poetic) to know a person
  5. to feel

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *kannijaną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵn̥néh₃ti, from *ǵneh₃- (to know).

Verb[edit]

kenna

  1. to know (a person)
  2. to feel
  3. (with dative) to teach someone

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • kenna”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

ken +‎ -na

Contraction[edit]

kenna

  1. do not know
    • 1822, John Galt, chapter XCIX, in Sir Andrew Wylie, of that Ilk:
      I kenna how it was, that at the time I didna experience such a sorrow as I should have felt.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      'Stop!' says he, — 'stop, Laird Heriotside! I kenna what your errand is, but it is to no holy purpose that ye're out on Beltane E'en. D' ye no hear the warring o' the waters?'

Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

kenna

  1. to know (be acquainted or familiar with)

Yakan[edit]

Noun[edit]

kenna

  1. fish

Verb[edit]

kenna

  1. to fish